Memorials to Fallen K-9s
 2010-S
The F.A.S.T. Co. donates sets of memorial cards to all partners 
 I need your help to inform me of such losses.

Dept. addresses available for those who want to send condolences to officers. See below

Suspect, police dog killed in shootout

 

The Associated Press

A robbery suspect was shot and killed during a gunbattle that also claimed the life of a police dog.

Police say the suspect stole a car in a dollar store parking lot and evaded police for a half hour Monday night before crashing the vehicle. The suspect ran as a police helicopter tracked him. The K9, named Sarge, was let off the leash to pinpoint the suspect's location.

That's when shots were fired. Police say they aren't sure if the suspect shot Sarge or if the dog was caught in the gunfire exchange.

Jacksonville Police Chief John Hartley credited Sarge for keeping the officers safe.

The suspect's name has not been released. Police continue to look for a second suspect.

Three officers were placed on administrative leave pending an internal investigation.



Read more: http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/12/28/1991093/suspect-police-dog-killed-in-shootout.html#ixzz19PdSbDnp
In Loving Memory of
K9 SPARK
December 2, 2010

C
oppertone Sparks A'Flyin'
Burke County Sheriff's Dept.
NC


K9 "Coppertone Sparks a Flyin'" was retrained for Narcotics, Area and Article Searching, Trailing, and placed back into service for the Burke County Sheriff's Department.  Certified through ESWDA: 1999-2004

Now Retired, resided with handler until "Spark" passed away on 12-02-2010.  R.I.P.
     "Until we meet again"
submitted by Handler....
 

In Loving Memory of
K9 SULTAN & MWD
December 21, 2010

Handler:  Robert Petitt
Garden City Police Department
100 Central Avenue,
Garden City, GA
31405-9374

(912) 966-7770

I just got a message from Robert Petitt, son of Bruce Petitt   He lost K9 Sultan recently – 12/ 21/ 2010  and would like him added to your site.  K9 Sultan was a U.S. Military K9, then worked for the Garden City Police
Department in GA. 
submitted by Tracy Klett 
                   


In Loving Memory of
K9 SARGE

December 27, 2010


Handler: Officer Brad Smith
Jacksonville Police Department

Florida 501 E. Bay St.
Jacksonville, FL
904.630-0500

Police Kill Dollar Store Robbery Suspect, K9 Killed

Jacksonville police fatally shot a robbery suspect Monday night in a gunbattle on the Westside that also claimed the life of a police dog. It was unclear if the suspect shot the dog, “Sarge,” or it was caught in the exchange of gunfire. Officers chased and a canine engaged the suspect. The suspect then fired multiple shots, and the officers fired multiple shots as well. Chief John Hartley did not identify the man who was killed. Hartley said he was wearing the mask worn during the robbery when he was shot to death. Police were still looking late into the night for a second man who managed to get away after the robbery at the Family Dollar on Chaffee Point Boulevard.
The robbery was reported at 7:10 p.m. Hartley said the robber stole a car in the Dollar Store parking lot and evaded police for about a half-hour before crashing the car and getting out to run. A police helicopter and the K9 unit helped track the suspect in the 8200 block of Oregon Street, near Thomas Jefferson Elementary School, before the suspect and officers exchanged gunfire. Canine officers Jackson Short and Larry Propper were involved in the shooting along with Officer R.M. Silcox who were placed on administrative leave pending an
internal probe into the shooting.

Hartley credited Sarge, a five-year police dog, with keeping the officers safe. The suspect was in a ditch as officers closed in, Hartley said, and could have used the terrain as cover for an ambush. The dog was let off the leash to pinpoint the suspect’s location. “That dog did exactly what it was supposed to do,” Hartley said. “He kept those officers safe.” Theresa Williams, who stopped at a nearby gas station, said she saw the cars speeding down Beaver Street before her husband heard gunshots. “There was a car flying down the street with the cops right behind him,” Williams said. “We were scared.”
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA & Lawman5602@aol.com <Lawman5602@aol.com>

In Loving Memory of
K9 SCOOBY

August 22, 2010
    

Handler: Officer Jay Loschen
 
Urbana Police Department
400 S Vine Street
Urbana, Illinois 61801
(217)384-2320
 
Retired Urbana police dog dies

Urbana police Officer Jay Loschen and Scooby

Urbana police employees are mourning the loss of a retired co-worker. Scooby, the former drug-sniffing canine partner of Officer Jay Loschen, died about 6:30 p.m. Sunday. Loschen was with him. The black Labrador retriever mix was retired from the department in the fall of 2008 after eight years on the job. He had been Loschen's partner for six of those years and was credited with helping in at least 500 cases. Loschen said he was on his way home from out of town Sunday when his daughter let him know that Scooby could barely move.
As soon as he got home, Loschen took him to the veterinarian, who opined that the dog had some sort of neurological problem and it was unknown if he could recover. Loschen said he believed Scooby was almost 15 years old. After Scooby's retirement in 2008, he was taken off the city's inventory and became Loschen's personal dog, sharing space in Loschen's back yard with Hunter, his current canine partner. Although Loschen said he felt Scooby's life might be nearing an end, as Labs don't live much longer than 15 years, he found it harder than he realized to have his animal euthanized.
"It was definitely harder than I thought it was going to be. I never had to put one down. I probably spent more time with him than my kids. Even Hunter is dealing with it in the way dogs do," he said. The two dogs didn't appear to get along when Loschen was with them but when he was away from them, they would lie next to each other, said Loschen, a 10-year employee of the Urbana police department. "Monday, (Hunter) was looking around the yard for him. To him, Scooby was like a dad," Loschen said of his almost 4-year-old black Labrador retriever. "Part of me was hoping it would happen at home. I wish I had taken him to the emergency clinic in my squad instead of my truck so he could have a last ride. I was hoping it wasn't his last ride," Loschen said.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 SCHULTZ
November 30, 2010
 


Handler:  Cpl.
Mark Pickard
Gloucester Township Police Department

1261 Chews Landing Road
Clementon, NJ 08021-2807
(856) 228-4500

Work nearly done at memorial for fallen police dog

Posted: Jan 14, 2012 11:41 AM EST Updated: Jan 14, 2012 11:41 AM EST

GLOUCESTER TOWNSHIP, N.J. (AP) - Officials say work at a memorial being built in honor of a fallen southern New Jersey police dog should be completed within the next few months.

The memorial under construction at a Gloucester Township park is a tribute to Schultz, a 3 1/2-year-old German Shepherd who was thrown into traffic on Route 42 in November 2010 while trying to help his police handler subdue a robbery suspect. The dog's death spurred lawmakers to approve a measure that imposes stiffer sentenced on people who intentionally kill police dogs or dogs involved in search and rescue operations.

Deputy Gloucester Township Police Chief David Harkins tells the Courier-Post of Cherry Hill (http://on.cpsj.com/x94HYY) that landscaping work at the memorial site is "pretty much done." But lighting and flagpoles still need to be installed.

nformation from: Courier-Post, http://www.courierpostonline.com/

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Memorial service for police K-9 Schultz planned

Wednesday, December 08, 2010, 8:29 AM  -Updated: Wednesday, December 08, 2010, 8:46 AM
GLOUCESTER TWP. — There will be a public Memorial Service to honor Gloucester Township Police K-9 “Schultz” who was killed in the line of duty while apprehending a robbery suspect — who turned out to be a Washington Township man — on Thursday at 2 p.m. at the Gloucester Township Community Park, 400 Hickstown Road. 
The Memorial will include the unveiling of a K-9 Memorial sign, full police honors, including a bag pipe band, honor guards, a rifle salute, and possibly a helicopter fly over.  
 A procession of all Gloucester Township Police vehicles will begin at approximately 1:40 p.m. at the Chews Landing Veterinary Hospital, 1179 Chews Landing Road, and will process through Gloucester Township with K-9 Schultz's cremated remains to the Gloucester Township Community Park.  
The public is encouraged to attend this memorial.  Parking will be available in the Community Park, and upon capacity, overflow parking will be at the former CYO parking lot at Camden County College, on Peter Cheeseman Road.  Busing transportation will be available to and from the remote parking lot.  
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The memorial service for Officer K-9 Schultz will be on December 9th, 2010 at 2:00 PM. The memorial will take place at the Gloucester Township Community Park at 400 Hickstown Rd in Sicklerville, NJ. It is at the intersection of Peter Cheeseman Rd and Hickstown Rd.

A memorial fund has been established to assist in funding a
Gloucester Township Police K-9 Memorial for Gloucester Township Community Park. For those who are requesting to make a donation please make a check payable to :
"K-9 Schultz Memorial Fund"
addressed to
Community Relations Bureau
Gloucester Township Police
1261 Chews Landing Road
Laurel Springs, NJ 08021
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

A police dog lost its life after being hurled into traffic on route 42. It all began at 7:10 p.m. The suspect then fled across the divided highway, setting off an intense search that continued into the evening in the Blackwood section. "This is a sad loss," said Gloucester Township Police Chief Harry Earle, noting the K-9 Shultz's death showed the danger that accompanies police work. "We think very highly of our K-9s. They are members of our department." The  two men that robbed the Lucky Dragon restaurant in the 400 block of East Church Street, then fled on foot, Earle said.
A township police officer and the K-9 dog soon spotted one suspect in a wooded area along the southbound lanes of the nearby highway. "The dog was released to make the apprehension, but during the apprehension the suspect threw the dog into traffic," Earle said. "When you hear that, it makes it even more tragic."  "No respect for injuring someone and no respect for injuring an animal, as well," Earle said. The dog died immediately, struck by oncoming traffic, after having served most of its 3-and-half year life. The two suspects remained at large
 at 10:30 p.m.
Township residents reported an all-out manhunt, with helicopters hovering overhead and officers ordering people to stay inside their homes. Police established a command post at Highland Regional High School, Earle said. The township police department has three K-9s. Patrolman Mark Pickard, K9 Shultz's handler has been with the K-9 Unit since 1999. Patrolman Pickard is also a Certified Police Canine Trainer. K-9 Schultz was a Certified Patrol and Narcotics dog and member of the United States Police Canine Association Region #15.
 "This K-9 has served us well in many apprehensions and in interactions with the community, including local children," he added. The clerk at the restaurant suffered minor injuries. Police say they will honor the police dog in the near future.  Anyone with information on the suspects is asked to call Gloucester Township Police at 856-842-5560.
Cpl. Mark Pickard and his K-9 Partner "Shultz" took 1st Place in Obedience, 1st Place in Scent Detection, 2nd Place in Agility, and 2nd Place in Individual Overall Competition, and received his PD1 certification. Ptl. Jim Kaelin and his K-9 Partner "Brutus" took 2nd Place in Scent Detection, and received his PD1 certfication.
M O R E

Police have identified the two men arrested after a Camden County police dog was thrown into traffic and killed Tuesday night.     

20 -year-old Skyler Robinson and 19-year-old Evan Scotese, both from Sewell NJ, are being held on $150,000 full cash bail. Both are charged with robbery and resisting arrest. Robinson charged with assaulting a law enforcement animal. The dog killed, named Shultz, was a member of the Gloucester Township, New Jersey police force. Around 7:00 Tuesday night, police say Robinson and Scotese held up the Lucky Dragon Chinese Restaurant in 400 block of East Church Street in the Blackwood section of Gloucester Township. Police say they assaulted an employee, grabbed money from the register, and fled on foot. The canine picked up the scent of one of the suspects behind the restaurant. A half mile away, the German shepherd caught up with Robinson on the shoulder of Route 42.     
Somehow, police say Robinson got ahold of Shultz and threw him into oncoming traffic. Shultz was killed instantly. Robinson also was injured by the car that struck Shultz. A person convicted of killing a police animal in New Jersey could be sentenced to five years in prison. Overnight, Gloucester Township police officers lined up outside the Chews Landing Veterinary Hospital. They saluted a fallen hero, a K-9 who had served as part of their police force for nearly all of its three and a half year life. The German shepherd lived with a family and they too came to the animal hospital to say a final goodbye. "It's a very difficult time for us tonight," said Gloucester Township Police Chief Harry Earle. "There was no respect for injuring someone. And obviously no respect for injuring an animal as well." Meanwhile
, Gloucester Township Police announced on Facebook
Memorial service - Dec. 9th
MORE:

Ex-South Jersey football star held in police dog's death
By GEORGE MAST • Courier-Post Staff • December 2, 2010
Skyler Robinson, 20, was struggling with K-9 Shultz along an embankment near Route 42 Tuesday night when he swung the three-year-old German shepherd out into traffic, township police Chief Harry Earle said at a press conference Wednesday. Robinson and 20-year-old Evan Scotese, both of the Sewell section in Washington Township, allegedly robbed a nearby Chinese eatery shortly before they were tracked down by the K-9 and his handler, Cpl. Mark Pickard.  Schultz's death was marked with an air of somberness on Wednesday. Flags outside the township municipal building along Chews Landing Road flew at half staff.
Postings about the incident on the police department's Facebook page and a separate tribute page in honor of the dog garnered hundreds of responses in condolence.  Earle described the press conference as a "sad occasion" and talked of a host of "tearful phone calls" that have poured into the township regarding the K-9s death. A memorial fund has already been established for Schultz and a service to honor the K-9's two years of service is planned for next Thursday. "This pet is not only a law enforcement officer," Earle said. "This is a family pet and a family friend to the Pickard family." Schultz went home with Pickard each night. Pickard, who has been with the department's K-9 unit since its inception in 1999, has been given a leave of absence, Earle said. Earle said the township, which has two other K-9s, will eventually replace K-9 Schultz. Police K-9s can cost anywhere from $3,000 to $10,000, Earle said.  Lillian Kline, president and founder of Our K9 Heroes, called Schultz's death a "pure tragedy."  Kline holds a yearly ceremony in Gloucester Township honoring service dogs. Each year, K-9 Schultz attended, she said. "It is absolutely horrendous," Kline said of the K-9's death.
SERVICE for K9 Schultz 
Dec. 9, 2010  2PM
photos from the Gloucester County Times
*****************************************************************




 

NJ K-9 killed in line of duty honored with service

Thursday, Dec. 9, 2010, in Gloucester Township, N.J., at a memorial service for Schultz, a Gloucester Township police dog killed in the line of duty, Nov. 30, 2010, while trying to capture a suspect in a restaurant robbery. 

A police dog who died in the line of duty was honored Thursday with a police memorial service complete with a rifle salute, helicopter flyover, bagpipe band, 150 police dogs, and more than 1,000 mourners. Schultz, a 3-year-old German Shepherd, was killed Nov. 30. Police say he sunk his teeth into the forearm of a robbery suspect he had tracked down; the man swung his arm, and Schultz was thrown into the path of a car. He was hit and killed. Twenty-year-old Skyler Robinson was charged with the dog's death. The crime is punishable by up to five years in prison.  

Since Schultz's death alongside Route 42, the community reaction has been much like it would be for a fallen human officer. Flags at the township building in this Philadelphia suburb have flown at half-staff, and police officers have black bands over their badges. More than 100 officers, many of them from other towns, joined in the three-hour manhunt for Robinson, now jailed in Camden County. The memorial service, too, was a somber, tearful one.  

Schultz's partner, Police Cpl. Mark Pickard, and Pickard's family sat in the front row during the ceremony at a park. Officials unveiled a memorial to Schultz and other deceased police dogs who have served the town since it started a K-9 unit in the late 1990s. Gloucester Township Mayor David Mayer said Schultz exemplified three important traits: "Courage, pride and loyalty. All of these are unconditional virtues that transcend his commitment to Corporal Pickard and the residents of our community."Schultz was named after former Philadelphia Flyers hockey player Dave "The Hammer" Schultz from a fifth-grader's winning entry in an essay contest. With Pickard, the dog won 10th place in October in a competition for police dogs from across the country. Former Stafford Township Police Chief Thomas Conroy, who helped the pair train this year, said Schultz was involved in several arrests and once tracked down a shooting suspect.
But at the Pickard home, Schultz was a typical dog who got into trouble, flooding the family's yard with a garden hose and creating havoc when he broke some dishes in the dishwasher after he was caught trying to lick crumbs off them, Conroy said. Like other police dogs, Schultz lived with his officer-partner — and was almost never apart from him. "No bond is stronger than the bond between a human officer and his dog," Conroy said.

The police dogs at the service barked during the rifle salute, but otherwise sat at attention in orderly rows. Other dogs — some working animals like guide dogs in training and others simply pets — were also taken to the service. Terry McCulley, a Gloucester Township resident brought his German Shepherd-huskie mix, Diesel. "I can relate to the loss. He's 3, too," he said. Our family would be devastated if something happened to him." Another resident, Mary Quattrone, said a police K-9 helped catch someone who had broken into her home. She said that made her appreciate the police dogs even more, but she would have attended the service anyway. "To me," she said, "that was an officer killed in the line of duty."
M O R E

Honors for NJ K-9 killed in line of duty 

A police dog who died in the line of duty was honored Thursday with a police memorial service complete with a rifle salute, helicopter flyover, bagpipe band, 150 police dogs, and more than 1,000 mourners.  Schultz, a 3“-year-old German Shepherd, was killed Nov. 30. Police say he sunk his teeth into the forearm of a robbery suspect he had tracked down; the man swung his arm, and Schultz was thrown into the path of a car. He was hit and killed. Twenty-year-old Skyler Robinson was charged with the dog's death. The crime is punishable by up to five years in prison. Since Schultz's death alongside Route 42, the community reaction has been much like it would be for a fallen human officer.
Flags at the township building in this Philadelphia suburb have flown at half-staff, and police officers have black bands over their badges. More than 100 officers, many of them from other towns, joined in the three-hour manhunt for Robinson, now jailed in Camden County.
The memorial service, too, was a somber, tearful one. Schultz's partner, Police Cpl. Mark Pickard, and Pickard's family sat in the front row during the ceremony at a park. Officials unveiled a memorial to Schultz and other deceased police dogs who have served the town since it started a K-9 unit in the late 1990s. Gloucester Township Mayor David Mayer said Schultz exemplified three important traits: "Courage, pride and loyalty. All of these are unconditional virtues that transcend his commitment to Corporal Pickard and the residents of our community."
Schultz was named after former Philadelphia Flyers hockey player Dave "The Hammer" Schultz from a fifth-grader's winning entry in an essay contest. With Pickard, the dog won 10th place in October in a competition for police dogs from across the country.
Former Stafford Township Police Chief Thomas Conroy, who helped the pair train this year, said Schultz was involved in several arrests and once tracked down a shooting suspect. But at the Pickard home, Schultz was a typical dog who got into trouble, flooding the family's yard with a garden hose and creating havoc when he broke some dishes in the dishwasher after he was caught trying to lick crumbs off them, Conroy said. Like other police dogs, Schultz lived with his officer-partner -- and was almost never apart from him.
"No bond is stronger than the bond between a human officer and his dog," Conroy said.
The police dogs at the service barked during the rifle salute, but otherwise sat at attention in orderly rows. Other dogs -- some working animals like guide dogs in training and others simply pets -- were also taken to the service. Terry McCulley, a Gloucester Township resident brought his German Shepherd-huskie mix, Diesel. "I can relate to the loss. He's 3“, too," he said. Our family with be devastated it something happened to him." Another resident, Mary Quattrone, said a police K-9 helped catch someone who had broken into her home. She said that made her appreciate the police dogs even more, but she would have attended the service anyway. "To me," she said, "that was an officer killed in the line of duty."
Bob & I were 2 of the 1000 mourners on this day, December 9, 2010. 
This was the largest K9 service we ever attended, since K9 Sirius after 9-11.

New law targets K-9 cop killers
Two South Jersey legislators want a mandatory five-year jail term for anyone convicted of killing a police dog.Their proposal, called "Schultz's Law," takes its name from a Gloucester Township K-9 who died in the line of duty last week. A memorial service with full police honors for the dog is to be held Thursday afternoon at a Gloucester Township park.Authorities allege Schultz was thrown into traffic on Route 42 while the K-9 was trying to subdue a robbery suspect on the night of Nov. 30. A Washington Township man, 20-year-old Skyler Robinson, is charged with the dog's death."Schultz died a hero," said state Sen. Fred Madden, D-Gloucester, a sponsor of the bill.
*found photos on line... by the Gloucester County Times........ please accept my appreciation for using them.  LK
also submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA

MORE:

Work nearly done at memorial for fallen police dog

Update: Jan. 2011

GLOUCESTER TOWNSHIP, N.J. (AP) - Officials say work at a memorial being built in honor of a fallen southern New Jersey police dog should be completed within the next few months.

The memorial under construction at a Gloucester Township park is a tribute to Schultz, a 3 1/2-year-old German Shepherd who was thrown into traffic on Route 42 in November 2010 while trying to help his police handler subdue a robbery suspect. The dog's death spurred lawmakers to approve a measure that imposes stiffer sentenced on people who intentionally kill police dogs or dogs involved in search and rescue operations.

Deputy Gloucester Township Police Chief David Harkins tells the Courier-Post of Cherry Hill (http://on.cpsj.com/x94HYY) that landscaping work at the memorial site is "pretty much done." But lighting and flagpoles still need to be installed.

Information from: Courier-Post, http://www.courierpostonline.com/

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Killing a police dog would result in more penalties under Madden-Norcross bill
Published: Tuesday,
May 10, 2011

TRENTON — Legislation sponsored by Senators Fred Madden (D-Gloucester/Camden) and Donald Norcross (D-Camden/Gloucester) that would enhance the penalties for intentionally killing an on-duty police or search and rescue dog was passed by the full Assembly. 
The measure was drafted in response to the November 30, 2010 killing of Schultz, a 3 1/2 year-old German shepherd and member of Gloucester Township’s police force. After tracking down a robbery suspect and latching onto the man’s arm, Schultz was purposefully thrown into the path of oncoming traffic, where he was struck and killed. 
“Police dogs are not dogs that simply work alongside our police, they are part of the police force.  They provide a tremendous service and perform a vital function in assisting and protecting our police officers. 
  Schultz died in the line of duty doing exactly what he was trained to do – hunt down criminal suspects and help their human handlers arrest them so they can be brought to justice.  Protecting these animals, who are in turn protecting us, is to be taken seriously,” said Madden. 
Under the Madden/Norcross bill (S-2541/A-3732), criminals found guilty of killing a police dog or a dog engaged in a search and rescue operation would receive a mandatory minimum five-year prison term, with no eligibility for parole, and a $15,000 fine.  
Killing a police or search and rescue dog currently is a third-degree crime and carries penalties of between three to five years in prison and fines of up to $15,000. 
Schultz was well-known throughout Gloucester Township, where he was a fixture at police presentations to schools and local organizations. He lived with his handler, Cpl. Mark Pickard, and his family. He was memorialized with full police honors; the memorial service drew hundreds of residents and K-9 police units
 from as far away as Virginia. 
“Just as in Gloucester Township, police dogs are integral members of any force and vital in helping to keep our communities safe,” said Norcross. “They deserve the full protection of the law, especially when they are carrying out their duties. There is no doubt that Schultz was considered every bit a working member of the police by the community and considered a hero among its residents for his work to keep them safe.”   
The bill now heads to the governor’s desk.

MORE::::::::::::::::::::::::::

NJ Gov. Christie signs Schultz's law, upgrading penalties for killing police and rescue dogs

Governor also signs law to determine needs of Alzheimer's victims

Legislation enhancing penalties for intentionally killing an on-duty police or search and rescue dog is one of two bills signed into law by Gov. Chris Christie, his office announced on Wednesday.

The measure is called “Schultz’s Law” in memory of a Gloucester Township police dog killed by a crime suspect on Nov. 30, 2010 Schultz, was a 3 1/2 year-old German Shepherd. After tracking down a robbery suspect and latching onto the man’s arm, Schultz was thrown into oncoming traffic, where he was struck and killed. The legislation was sponsored in the Senate by Senators Fred Madden and Donald Norcross (both D-Camden), and in the Assembly by Assemblymen Paul Moriarty (D-Gloucester), Ruben Ramos (D-Hudson), and Charles Mainor (D-Hudson).

“Dogs that assist law enforcement are valuable allies in the fight against crime,” Moriarty said. “Schultz was doing nothing more than his job – serving and protecting the public. This law will ensure all K-9 officers have strong protections against those who break society’s rules.”  Under the new law, criminals found guilty of killing a police dog or a dog engaged in a search and rescue operation will receive a mandatory minimum five-year prison term, with no eligibility for parole, and a $15,000 fine. Killing a police or search and rescue dog previously was a third-degree crime and carried penalties of between three to five years in prison and fines of up to $15,000.

Schultz was well-known throughout Gloucester Township, where he was a fixture at police presentations to schools and local organizations. He lived with his handler, Cpl. Mark Pickard, and his family. He was memorialized with full police honors; the memorial service drew hundreds of residents and K-9 police units from as far away as Virginia.

“Dogs that assist law enforcement are loyal allies in the fight against crime,” Ramos said. “This dog, like many others, was simply doing his job serving and protecting the public. They deserve legitimate protection against abuse, and those who abuse them need to face severe punishment.”

—TOM HESTER SR., NEWJERSEYNEWSROOM.COM

submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA

In Loving Memory of
K9 SASHA
December 1, 2010
   
Handler: Cpl. Jason Comer
Burlington Police Department
267 West Front Street

Burlington, NC 27215-3703
(336) 229-3550

WEBSITE - http://www.ci.burlington.nc.us/index.aspx?NID=53 

Burlington Police K-9 Dies From Lung Cancer - K-9 Assisted In 109 Arrests
A Burlington police K-9 died this week after police said she was diagnosed before Thanksgiving with an advanced  stage of lung cancer. Burlington police said the dog, named Sasha, assisted in 108 arrests, including 166 felony and 160 misdemeanor charges during her time on the force.

"We are all aware that the police K-9 is more than a tool used in law enforcement. Police K-9s and their handlers not only spend countless hours training and working together, but they become loyal members of the handler's family. We are sorrowed to lose a dedicated member of this department," said Police Assistant Chief Greg Seel. Sasha's handler was Cpl. Jason Comer, Seel said.
MORE
DATE/ TIME: December 1, 2010
INCIDENT:  K-9 Death
LOCATION: Burlington 
CONTACT: Assistant Chief Greg Seel
PHONE#: 229-3543 

It is with deep regret that The Burlington Police Department acknowledges the death of one of its K-9’s, Sasha. Sasha was diagnosed with an aggressive form of lung cancer that was discovered shortly before the Thanksgiving Holidays. Unfortunately, the disease had advanced to the stage where a treatment plan was not an option.
Sasha was the partner of Cpl. Jason Comer. Cpl. Comer’s dedication to the K-9 program, and Sasha was a model of success for not only the Burlington Police Department K-9’s program, but other Police agencies through out the State of North Carolina and United States Police Canine Region II.
Sasha had been an integral part of the success of the Police Departments K-9 unit. Sasha started her career in October of 2006, and in that time was deployed 579 times, and assisted in the arrest of 108 persons, including 166 Felony Charges and 160 Misdemeanor charges.
“ We are all aware that the Police K-9 is more than a tool used in Law Enforcement. Police K-9’s and their handlers not only spend countless hours training and working together, but they become loyal members of the handlers family. We are sorrowed to loose a dedicated member of this department” 
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 SONJA
July 30, 2010

 
Handler: Sgt. Ron Clapper
Carroll County Sheriff’s Department

43 2nd Street Southeast

Carrollton, OH 44615-1408
(330) 627-2141

WEBSITE - http://www.carrollcountyohio.net/sheriff.html
Sheriff loses K-9 unit

The Carroll County Sheriff’s Department lost a respected and faithful member of its department Friday – the county’s first K9 unit. Sonja, a 9-year-old Dutch Shepherd, was due for retirement in January of 2011 but had to be put down due to a sudden illness. The department honored her life, and her devotion to the sheriff’s department and her partner, Sgt. Ron Clapper, by flying the flag at half staff in front of the sheriff’s office. Sonja joined the department in June of 2007. She completed a 15-week training period sponsored by the Canton Police Department. She was trained in narcotics, officer protection, criminal apprehension and tracking.
The K9 unit was donated to the sheriff’s department by the Canton Police Department K9 Assn., who also donated the training. Sonja had been provided to the county at no charge to residents.  Clapper said a dog like Sonja including training, would cost about $20,000 but he donated his vacation and comp time in order to save the county the costs associated with that training. “Sonja was a tremendous asset to our department,” Sheriff Dale Williams said. “She was a vital and dependable member of our team. Her services to this office will be greatly missed.”
In anticipation of her retirement, various fundraisers have been held. Currently, a gun raffle is being conducted. Tickets are available at $20 each and can be purchased through members of the department.   Donations can be made to the Police K9 Assn. at the sheriff’s department in care of Sgt. Clapper. Donations should be earmarked for Carroll County. All funds will be used toward the purchase and training of
a new K9 unit.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 SEP
November 17, 2010

Handler: Const. Keith Fleury 
Previous handler: Const. Mike Grant
Brockville Police Service
P.O. Box 2050
2269 Parkedale Avenue
Brockville, ON   K6V 6N5
Phone: (613) 342-0127
Fax: (613) 342-0452
 
Retired police dog passes away 

Brockville Police are mourning the loss of one of their own today, the canine Sep who served the force for more than six years. Sep, who was partnered with Const. Mike Grant as his handler, retired from active duty in 2008. He was 11 when he passed away Wednesday. Sep replaced the police force's first canine, Brock, who was handled by Const. Keith Fleury. Brock retired in 2004 and is also deceased.
C
onst. Shawn Borgford is handler of the third police dog, Trax, the active canine unit for the force. Police Chief Adrian Geraghty said the police dogs help in numerous investigations dealing with drug activity, break-ins, mischief and vandalism and missing or wanted persons. But they also are ambassadors to the community and regularly visit schools and nursing homes and put on demonstrations at public events, said Geraghty. "Any canine is not just a tool. It's a member of the police service."
Sep's death weighs heavily on the officers and particularly on Const. Grant and his family, said Geraghty, who offered them condolences on behalf of the police service. Geraghty said the name Sep was chosen during a public contest and was given in honour of the fallen emergency service workers who died after responding to the 9/11 terrorist attacks in New York City. Insp. Scott Fraser said the canine units are popular at the schools and students still talk about Brock and Sep when Trax visits. "They are part of the police family," said Fraser.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


Police K9 Sally of Saginaw Township, who searched Ground Zero in New York, dies from tumor

In Loving Memory of
K9 SALLY
November 8, 2010

Handler: Police Officer Jason Wise
Birch Run Police Department
120 Heath St.
Birch Run, MI  48415
(989) 624.1113

Police K9 Sally of Saginaw Township,
who searched Ground Zero in New York, dies from tumor

Sally, a 12-year-old police canine owned by Birch Run Police Officer Jason Wise, died from complications caused by a suspected brain tumor Monday, her owner says. Wise bought Sally, a police-trained black European Labrador retriever, in Canada for $10,000 when she was a pup. He said she attained hero status after spending a week rummaging the rubble of the World Trade Center after the 2001 terrorist attacks. She located 11 victims. The scent-savvy pooch worked for police departments in Breckenridge and St. Louis alongside Wise before they moved to Saginaw Township and took a job at the Birch Run Police Department about 10 years ago.

Upon return from the New York search-and-rescue operation, Sally was decommissioned and subsequently endured chronic health problems caused by inhaling toxic dust at Ground Zero, though she lived three years longer than doctors predicted based on exposure in New York that contaminated 65 percent of her lungs, Wise said. She remained active, working with Wise when he gave speeches about their experience at the World Trade Center, attended public relations events for the police department and to train new K9 dogs and their handlers. But more than a working dog, she was a family member, Wise said, and will be missed greatly.
MORE----

Police dogs are tools, but Sally was something more, her owner says. While he was out of state for training on Monday, Birch Run police Officer Jason Wise learned that his dog of 12 years, “Sal,” had died. Wise had purchased the black European Labrador retriever as a pup from a Canadian trainer for $10,000.
Sally had helped arrest suspects during drug busts and led Wise through the foot-and-a-half deep toxic rubble of World Trade Center in search of victims; she kept special sleeping spots under the bed of Jason Wise II, the officer’s 8-year-old son, and another in her “favorite corner,” behind her master’s seat in the living room.

“I got the news while I was in class, and I actually had to step out of class and take an hour,” said Jason Wise, a member of the state police Internet Crimes Against Children task force, who returns from a computer forensics training session in Utah today. “She was a working dog, she was former K-9 officer, and she was one of our family members,” Wise said. At 12, suffering from reduced lung capacity and a suspected brain tumor that caused seizures and ultimately led her death, Sally lived three years longer than veterinarians projected,
Wise said.
She was one of 300 K-9s that worked in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks at Ground Zero. Saginaw police Officer Joaquin Guerrero’s 8-year-old search dog, Rookie, who also served at Ground Zero, died in 2004 from a cancerous growth in his jaw. Three other dogs from Saginaw County — Felony, Mizu, Jake and Kinsey — owned between Joaquin Guerrero and his former wife, Cari Guerrero, also traveled to New York City to help with the search.
University of Pennsylvania Veterinarian Cynthia Otto said an ongoing study of 95 Ground Zero K-9s revealed minimal long-term impact on lung function among those tested.
In Sally’s case, Wise said he learned from veterinarians, crushed concrete dust and other inhalants breathed in during the dog’s six-day search-and-rescue mission in 2001 contaminated 65 percent of her lungs. He retired her within a year of Sept. 11, 2001, because of breathing difficulties. There’s a special picture of Sally at Wise’s home in Saginaw Township, where he lives with his wife, Elida, 35; their 10-year-old daughter, Kaitlin; and 8-year-old son, Jason II.
In it, Sally rests during a Birch Run Township Police Department event. Casually perched on forelegs with her cockeyed hindquarters plopped on the concrete, her silver police badge dangling from her collar, she twists in the direction of a 14-month old toddler and licks the smiling boy’s face. “That tells you what kind of dog she was,” Wise said. He said his children are taking the loss especially hard. “When (their grandmother) broke news to them, they both broke down and cried,” Wise said. “My daughter was gathering Sally’s hair ... where she usually laid, so she could put it in her scrapbook.  “Kaitlin would go hike in the woods, and they would try to get Sally to
go find her.

She (would) put her nose right down from the back end of the patio ... and go right to my daughter. “She just stood there and just licked her, and I remember Kaitlin laughing from behind a tree.”  Wise met his scent-savvy pooch in London, Ontario, and they spent two weeks training together before Sally moved to the Wise home. “She was wonderful. ... A very high-drive and very energetic pup,” even after health issues arose, Wise said. He attributes some of her health problems to exposure at Ground Zero,
but said he could not rule out old age.
Wise kept Sally busy, using her to display training techniques to other handlers, at police public relations events and at speaking engagements about their life-changing experience in New York, but she was “mostly just a family dog,” Wise said. Still, he said, he could never be too careful; Sally loved working.
 “When I was putting on my uniform, she was right next to the door, and she was asking to go,” Wise said. “I looked at her and I said, ‘You’re retired, girl; go lie down.’ ” Unwilling to disappoint Sally again, Wise altered his routine and dressed in his uniform at work each day.  Sally was cremated. Wise said he will have her ashes buried with him when he dies.


In Loving Memory of
K9 SARRY
October 1, 2001 - July 13, 2010

 
Handler:
Cpl. Scott Henderson 
Bixby Police Department
116 West Needles Avenue
Bixby, OK 74008-4410
(918) 366-8294

Name: Sarry vom alten Wingertshaus Call Name: Sarry (Sar Reeee) Badge #: 235
Breed: German shepherd Sex: Male Color: Dark Sable DOB: October 1, 2001
Imported from: Berlin, Germany Commands: German

WEBSITE - http://www.bixby.com/police/k9_patrol.php
The Bixby Police Department implemented Bixby's first K9 Support Division on October 1st, 2004.
In September 2004, Bixby Police Personnel traveled to Berlin, Germany and tested several prospect Police Canines before selecting Sarry. Sarry was certified as K9 support in February 2005. Sarry has since assisted in 2 fleeing felons and has seized Marijuana, Crack Cocaine, Methamphetamine and several pieces of drug equipment. Sarry has also assisted in several Search Warrants. 
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA
 

Sarry trained in the following:
Narcotics Detection: Marijuana, Cocaine, Methaphetamine, Heroin
Tracking, Handler Protection, Article Indication, Building/Area Serches

In Loving Memory of
K9 SABRE
July 7, 1999 - October 22, 2010


Handler: Officer Jim Bodner
Kettering Police Department
3100 Carrier Ave.
Kettering, OH  45429

K9 Sabre service the Kettering, Ohio Police Department from November 2000 to December 2007 with Officer Jim Bodner.  Savre was born on July 7, 1999 and passed on October 22, 2010.
waiting for more information
- - - -submitted by: DUSTY SIMON    k9dawgcop85@yahoo.com & Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 SCOOBY

August 22, 2010
Handler: Officer Jay Loschen 
Urbana Police Department
400 S Vine Street
Urbana, Illinois 61801
(217)384-2320
 
Retired Urbana police dog dies
Urbana police Officer Jay Loschen and Scooby
Urbana police employees are mourning the loss of a retired co-worker. Scooby, the former drug-sniffing canine partner of Officer Jay Loschen, died about 6:30 p.m. Sunday. Loschen was with him. The black Labrador retriever mix was retired from the department in the fall of 2008 after eight years on the job. He had been Loschen's partner for six of those years and was credited with helping in at least 500 cases. Loschen said he was on his way home from out of town Sunday when his daughter let him know that Scooby could barely move.
As soon as he got home, Loschen took him to the veterinarian, who opined that the dog had some sort of neurological problem and it was unknown if he could recover. Loschen said he believed Scooby was almost 15 years old. After Scooby's retirement in 2008, he was taken off the city's inventory and became Loschen's personal dog, sharing space in Loschen's back yard with Hunter, his current canine partner. Although Loschen said he felt Scooby's life might be nearing an end, as Labs don't live much longer than 15 years, he found it harder than he realized to have his animal euthanized.
"It was definitely harder than I thought it was going to be. I never had to put one down. I probably spent more time with him than my kids. Even Hunter is dealing with it in the way dogs do," he said. The two dogs didn't appear to get along when Loschen was with them but when he was away from them, they would lie next to each other, said Loschen, a 10-year employee of the Urbana police department. "Monday, (Hunter) was looking around the yard for him. To him, Scooby was like a dad," Loschen said of his almost 4-year-old black Labrador retriever. "Part of me was hoping it would happen at home. I wish I had taken him to the emergency clinic in my squad instead of my truck so he could have a last ride. I was hoping it wasn't his last ride," Loschen said.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA

In Loving Memory of
K9 SOLO
June 13, 2010

Handler: Det. Mike Tharp
Overton County Sheriff Department
1010 John T. Poindexter Dr.
Ph: 931.823.5634
Livingston, TN  38570 

Overton County Police Dog Dies From Heat
 
Overton County sheriff's detective, Mike Tharp, said he was shocked when he found his K-9 limp and lifeless in the dog's kennel June 13. "For the kind of dog he was, he wasn't very old at all," Tharp said. "He was one of those kinds of dogs anytime you went anywhere with him, you didn't worry about anybody jumping you from behind." Tharp said he and the dog, Solo, were at a heath fair the day before but that the K-9 stayed in the cool, air-conditioned car most of the hot summer day.
"He was fine when he got out of the car, chased me around, did some work around his pen, chased me around there for about 45 minutes," Tharp said. "(The) next morning, found him laying there." The cause of death was a heat seizure. "It was 95 degrees or so that evening when I brought him in and put him back in the pen," Tharp said. "They just seem to believe he got too hot." Tharp kept Solo in a kennel outside with shelter, food and a 25-gallon water bowl.
"I felt that Mike was taking care of him," said Sheriff W.B. Melton. "I don't feel like there was any neglect at all." John Stolzer owns Canine, Inc. in College Grove and is a national instructor for K-9 first aid. He said it's possible Solo could have had other health issues, but he said heat is more of a threat to dogs than humans. "Overheating will result in death in a dog," Stolzer said. "We're talking about a species that doesn't have enough of a heat regulation that's nearly advanced as ours."
The sheriff said his department bought Solo for $5,200 but that it's hard to put a price tag on just how valuable the dog was to the department. "He was a pet for my wife and little boy, but he was a partner for everybody else," Tharp said. The sheriff doesn't plan to reprimand Tharp and called the dog's death a tragic accident. He also said he plans to find another K-9 officer for the department in the future. As for detective Tharp, he said he plans to find a way to keep the kennel cooler.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA

In Loving Memory of
K9 SAGUS
February 2010


Handler:  Jim Doerr
Kalamazoo Department of Public Safety
150 E. Crosstown Pkwy. #A
Kalamazoo, MI  49001-2865
Ph: 269.337.8120

Kalamazoo Public Safety is the only police department in Kalamazoo County which has a Canine (K-9) unit. Their services are utilized throughout the county and the unit is overseen by Sgt. Sanderson.In 2007, the K-9 Unit responded to 1,080 calls for service, resulting in the arrest of 249 persons on 560 arrest charges. Included in these calls for service were assists to the following agencies:

Kalamazoo County Sheriff Department-69         
Kalamazoo Township P.D.-34
                   Portage P.D.-29        
Michigan State Police-7
Southwest Enforcement Team (SWET)-7           
Parchment P.D.-1
Western Michigan University P.D.-2
     Vicksburg P.D.-1   
Kalamazoo Valley (KVET)-76
 

In 2007, the K-9 Unit recovered $9,253 in stolen property, assisted in seizing drugs valued at $238,166 and in forfeiture of $90,137 in drug monies. In addition, the K-9 Unit presented 55 demonstrations at schools and other locations. In its 20-year history, the K-9 Unit has recovered stolen property valued at $404,312; made 3,320 arrests, and seized over $7.2 million in drugs and drug-related monies. 
In April 2007, the K-9 Unit attended the United States Police Canine Association (USPCA) Region 19 tracking and narcotic detection trials.  This is a competition and certification where KDPS handlers compete against more than 50 other handlers located throughout the region.  The KDPS canine team took home a total of five trophies.  Sgt. Scott Sanderson and PSO Jim Doerr placed 4th and 6th respectively in the field of tracking.  PSO Fred Milton placed 7th in individual narcotics detection and 1st in team narcotics detection.  PSO Marc Rifenberg placed 5th in team narcotics detection.  All department handlers received national certification in the areas of tracking and narcotics detection.  The canine team is an integral and valuable asset to Public Safety and the community we serve.  submitted by Jim
Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 SPROCKET
February, 2010
& Capt.Carrie Henger Neff
March 5, 2010


Los Angeles County Fire Department

On May 18, 2010, the Los Angeles County Fire Department honored two of their own, Captain Carrie Henger Neff and her K-9 partner, Sprocket, on what would would have been both of their birthdays. Carrie Henger Neff, the first woman in the LA County Fire Department's Honor Guard, passed away at the age of 54 on March 5, 2010, after a 4 & 1/2 year battle with ovarian cancer, which was service-related. She passed away with her husband, Bob Neff, a fellow Captain that retired from the City of Riverside Fire Department, at her side. Carrie and Bob had celebrated their first wedding anniversary just a few weeks before on Feb. 14. Bob was introduced to Carrie by her neighbors after she had begun chemotherapy treatments.

"As we come together to give thanks and praise to a God, who allowed for such a short time, Carrie and Sprocket to touch our lives," said Chaplain Dawn Marie Lafferty with the Fire Service Women of New York State. Carrie was honored at Descanso Gardens in La Canada Flintridge, California, a place that was extremely special to her. This is where she received her Captain's badge of promotion, and where she held the memorial service for her first K-9 partner, Spanner, after he was killed.

Susan De Antonio, a Rancho Cucamonga Fire Department K9 Handler says of Carrie and Spanner, "She went to the effort to accelerate detection certify him, she imprinted him, and he was actually a dual purpose dog. And it's the only one that we are aware of in the United States that could actually do both and be accepted as an expert in court for arson." After the death of Spanner, Carrie chose Sprocket as her new canine partner. She also worked with Doc, her search and rescue dog, and partner in California Task Force 2. At the end of his career, Sprocket was also diagnosed with cancer, a tumor in his spleen, which caused severe pain. Her husband Bob made the difficult decision to put Sprocket down just a week after Carried died.

Carrie was a pioneer, helping to develop the LA County Fire Department's K9 program. "Today, we have eight certified K9 Handlers in the LA County Department," explains Fire Chief P. Michael Freeman of the Los Angeles County Fire Department, "and we are interviewing four additional firefighter handlers to expand that program."

Carrie's love for animals was a constant throughout her life. Before going into the fire service, she trained many animals for movies and television shows. According to her sister, Owen Anderson, when Carrie went into the fire service, she learned what a key element the service dogs play for arson and search and rescue, which was a perfect way for her to use her two passions. She dedicated her career to the development of service dog programs within the Los Angeles County Fire Department.

"I think really her commitment and her vision of using K9's as partners and firefighters, carried her to special accomplishments," claims Chief Freeman. Carrie's last deployment was with her search dog Doc at Hurricane Katrina in 2005. When teams were being deployed to Haiti in January, Carrie was retired, but saw her vision become a reality when the dogs from L.A. County Fire Department, along with other departments, were able to locate human life beneath the rubble.

Chief Freeman adds, "Carrie was truly one of our departments visionaries and she will always be remembered for giving our firefighters another great option for saving lives: the K-9."
submitted by LRK & Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 SUGAR - SAR
July 4, 2010

 
Handler: Lt. Kyle Rosentreter
Carbon County Sheriff's Department
Colorado

Carbon Co. Sheriff's Deputy Injured In Crash; K9 killed

A Carbon County police car collided with another vehicle, injuring a sheriff's deputy and killing his search-and-rescue dog. The accident occurred Sunday about eight miles south of Saratoga on Wyoming 130. Carbon County Sheriff Jerry Colson says Lt. Kyle Rosentreter was being treated for a broken neck and other broken bones. Colson says Rosentreter is in stable condition at a Colorado hospital. Authorities say Rosentreter was en route to a report of missing hikers when the accident happened. They say an oncoming vehicle veered in front of the patrol car when its brakes locked up while pulling off to the side of the road. No citations have been issued, and the accident is under investigation.
MORE
Tragedy strikes over July 4th weekend
On Sunday, around 1 p.m., Carbon County Deputy Sheriff, Kyle Rosentreter was northbound on Highway 130 between Saratoga and the Highway 130 Junction, south of Saratoga. Rosentreter, who had just finished with a search and rescue at Battle Mountain, had been called to Rock Creek to help with another search and rescue. Rosentreter’s bloodhound, Sugar, had assisted in locating missing hikers from the Battle Mountain area, Sheriff Jerry Colson said in a phone interview Tuesday afternoon.
Rosentreter and Sugar had been requested to help find missing hikers in Rock Creek near Arlington, and was en route when he saw a pickup truck cross the center line into his lane of travel, according to Colson. Rosentreter attempted to avoid the oncoming vehicle and rolled after the impact. Rosentreter was transported, by ambulance, to Memorial Hospital of Carbon County, where he was stabilized, and then transported to the Medical Center of the Rockies in Loveland, Colo., said Colson.
He was transported by ground ambulance due to the turbulent weather,” Colson said. Rosentreter’s injuries included a broken neck, broken left hand, broken ribs on his left side and a broken left hip, Colson said. Rosentreter had surgery on his neck Monday and is in the surgical intensive care unit in stable condition, Colson added. Colson said Rosentreter has been with the sheriff’s department for 22 years and has mastered every program he has participated in since working for the sheriff’s office. Rosentreter was responsible for introducing the horse patrol program as well as the K-9 program and is certified as a master handler.
“He has built a tremendous program” (with the K-9 unit), said Colson, “He is unequivocally one of the best in the state.” Sugar, Rosentreter’s two-year-old bloodhound, was fatally injured in the accident. “She suffered a broken back, and died shortly afterward,” said Colson. The Saratoga and Encampment Volunteer Fire Department responded to the accident, where Rosentreter had to be extricated from his squad car. Colson added that Dr. Robert Merlo, a local veterinarian, responded to help with the dog. Sugar had just received her certification for training, Colson said.

Colson has set up an account at Bank of Commerce to help with traveling expenses, as Rosentreter will have “a lot of rehabilitation ahead of him.”
Donations, made out to Kyle Rosentreter, can be sent to Bank of Commerce, P.O. Box 50, Rawlins, WY 82301, or cards and checks can be sent to
 
Carbon County Sheriff,
c/o Jerry Colson,
P.O. Bo 190,
Rawlins, WY 82301
.
The Sun was told by Lieutenant Tom Adams, of the Wyoming Highway Patrol, that the  driver of the southbound Bronco had attempted to pull over on the shoulder of the southbound lane to allow Rosentreter by, as Rosentreter’s lights and sirens were on.

For an unknown reason, the left front tire of the Bronco locked up and the vehicle veered into Rosentreter’s northbound lane of travel. Phillip Smith, the driver of the Bronco, was transported to Memorial Hospital of Carbon County, said Adams, but was treated and released. Adams stated that the accident is still under investigation and no charges have been filed as of Tuesday. Adams said that if charges were filed, it would most likely be for faulty equipment.

submitted by Anne Lowachi, SAR & Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 SPANKY
April 15, 2000 - June 18, 2010

Handler: Officer Ray Crowley
New Haven Police Department

1 Union Avenue
New Haven, CT
 
(203) 776-0908

It is with deep regret and sorrow that I have to speak of the passing of my best friend and partner of the last nine years. Canine Spanky was put to rest today, June the 18th 2010.  Spanky served the New Haven Police Department and was a dedicated professional in the detection of explosive for seven years and my best friend and companion for nine. Spanky had given me opportunity far beyond that would have been afforded to me without him. I will forever be thankful for the time we spent both at work and at play.
My family and I would like to thank those responsible for bringing Spanky into our lives and those who helped Spanky reach his status and “fame”. Lt Ric Rohloff, SABT Sam DiPasquale, Master Sergeant Danny Lewis. Spanky’s classmates of the 99th Training Troop, Ozzy, Peanuts, Granite, Bob, Owen, Scout and Nuffy, the staff and trainers from the Ct State Police Canine Unit TFC Mike Winn and TFC Mark Linhard. We would also like to thank Peter Casolino for the allowing Spanky to be part of his published works. Through those books Spanky will continue to have a positive effect on the lives he has touched. Thank you, Ray Crowley

He was born April 15, 2000. I was suppose to become a guiding eyes dog but because i was traffic shy (I'm afraid of loud noises) I became an Explosive Detection K-9. I served with the New Haven Police Dept from Sept 2001-Jan 2008.

submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 SHADOW
June 10, 2010

Handler: Det. Lt. Stephen Dollinger
Middletown Police Department
1 Kings Highway
Middletown, NJ 
07748-2502
PH: 732.615.2100

Website - http://www.middletownnj.org/Police/index.asp

Middletown police dog euthanized after 11 years of service

The purebred golden retriever was surrounded by his handler and best friend, Acting Detective Lt. Stephen Dollinger, fellow officers, family and friends. Shadow was 15 years old. He began his police dog tenure with the Middletown Police Department in February of 1999 and attended the New Jersey State Police Canine Academy in West Trenton with his handler, Dollinger, according to police. "In 1999, I started the (canine) program and canine Shadow and I started our lives together," Dollinger said in a press release. After Shadow was trained in the detection of illegal narcotics, Shadow and Dollinger served in the patrol division before being reassigned together in April of 2005 to the detective bureau, where the dog served until his last days, Dollinger said. During his years with the police department, Shadow conducted more than 300 searches and was responsible for the arrests of countless people, according to police. He also was a key factor in the confiscation of large quantities of narcotics and the seizure of numerous motor vehicles, properties and significant amounts of currency, police said. "Shadow worked extremely hard until the last day of his life," Dollinger said, and also enjoyed participating in community functions and demonstrations. Shadow was certified until the end, and completed his last in-service training Tuesday, police said. Dollinger several other Bayshore towns started canine programs because of Shadow's success in the department. A ceremony was held at the Home Veterinary Service in the Belford section, here, according to police. Dollinger added, "We gave him a final tribute worthy of the tireless efforts he gave our department and the friendship he has given me and my family." After more than 11 years of service for the police department, beloved police dog Shadow was euthanized due to old age on Thursday, police said.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 SIMON
April 20, 2010

Handler: Officer Shawn Terrell
Oxford Police Department
101 East High Street
Oxford, OH 45056
(513) 523-4321

Oxford's First Drug Dog Dead at 9


The Oxford Police Department is looking for donations to replace its first Patrol/Narcotics K-9, Simon.   The 9-year-old Belgian Shepherd died April 20 of natural causes.   Jim Squance, department spokesman, said Simon's handler Officer Shawn Terrell awoke that morning to find the dog had died.
Donations may be made for a new police dog through the Oxford Community Foundation, 52 E. Park Place, Oxford, Ohio 45056. For information, call Squance at 513-524-5251.
Police K-9s generally cost $12,000, which includes training, Squance said.
During his career, Simon was not only state-certified, he was more notably certified by the U.S. Police Canine Association, which Squance said has more stringent standards.
Simon participated in many community activities such at the Annual Oxford Police Department Pig Roast and the Butler County Chiefs of Police Respect for Law Camp. He also put on numerous demonstrations for groups such as the Boy Scouts and the Humane Society.

submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 SCOUT
January 21, 2010

Handler: 
Officer Erik Detlefsen
Cedar Park Police
Department
911 Quest Parkway
Cedar Park, Texas78613
(512) 260-4600

WEBSITE - http://www.ci.cedar-park.tx.us/cp/pd.aspx 

Police Department mourns loss of K-9Cedar Park police experienced a sad and expensive loss Jan. 21 with the sudden and unexpected death of the police canine Scout. Police Lt. Carl Rackly said the dog died unexpectedly from mesenteric torsion, where the intestines become twisted, “typically from a strenuous twist of the body.” Scout was a five-year-old German Shepherd born in Slovakia. He joined the Cedar Park Police in July 2007 and became active with his handler Officer Erik Detlefsen on Aug. 10, 2007. “The sudden passing of Scout is a tremendous personal loss for Officer Detlefsen and his family as well as a major loss for the Cedar Park Police Department,” Police Capt. Jeff Hayes said.
“He was a true asset to the Cedar Park Police Department and he will be missed.” The night before his death, Scout and Detlefsen made a self-initiated drug arrest based on Scout’s detection work, Hayes said. “It is well known that Officer Detlefsen and K-9 Scout were a highly effective team,” he said. Although Scout had a short career with the Cedar Park police, he and Detlefsen were involved in hundreds of deployments, including narcotics sting operations, SWAT missions and searches for missing children.
Two of Scout’s most well known captures, police said, were tracking and locating two aggravated robbery suspects for the Round Rock police, and the apprehension of three suspects who were vandalizing the Cedar Park Center and had fled from the first officer on the scene.
As a result of the K-9 pair’s efforts, organizers honored Scout with a film montage at the Feb. 6 Texas Stars hockey game. Detlefsen and Scout were one of two Cedar Park K-9 units. Police Officer Jason Schmidt and K-9 Ory are the other team. Schmidt has worked for the department since May of 2000 and has been a K-9 handler since November 2004. Ory will turn seven years old this summer.  Hayes said recovery time would be given in recognition of Detlefsen’s loss, the plan is for Detlefsen to remain a K-9 officer who will be paired
 with another dog.
Police canines, although trained to be comfortable and friendly in group situations, are trained to protect and serve the community and their handlers. As a police dog, Scout was trained to track suspects and missing people, squeeze through narrow spaces, sniff out narcotics, perform area and building searches, apprehend fleeing suspects and protect his handler from an assault.  Police canines receive up to six months of training before being released into law enforcement services. The death of a large-breed dog, such as a German Shepherd, from mesenteric torsion doesn’t happen often but is not unusual, according to local veterinarian John Whitehill.

“German Shepherds are more disposed to it and Great Danes are the breed with the highest number of incidents,” he said. “Any dog breed with deep barrel chests has higher incidents, based on their anatomy. “It’s just a weird thing; it can just happen,” he said. This loss has left the police with the unexpected cost of a replacement canine, at an estimated cost of $15,000. The Cedar Park Citizen’s Police Academy Alumni Association, a non-profit support organization, is leading the campaign to raise money to buy another police K-9.
Dean Young, president of the group, said, “The members of the CPCPAAA are very saddened by the loss of Scout.  We will need the support of our community to raise the funds required for a new Cedar Park canine.” Roger Wilson, Cedar Park police chaplain, said, “This is a great opportunity for citizens to pull together, and we want to play a role and support this very worthwhile investment in the safety of our community.” The citizen’s police alumni group and the police chaplain group will organize fundraisers at local stores in the coming weeks.  Community donations will play a very large part in the non-profit’s ability to raise the funds needed to purchase
 another police canine.
Contributions to the Police Canine Unit Fund, which are tax-deductible, can be mailed or dropped off to the police department at 911 Quest Parkway, Cedar Park. For more information, call 401-5160.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 SKYE
March  2010

Handler: Constable Sean McNeil
Northern Constabulary's Police K9s
United Kingdom

Skye, who was handled by Constable Sean McNeil, was just 7-years-old when she died suddenly following a sudden illness.  The loss of PC McNeil's dog left the department and the Force in need of a quick replacement.
PC McNeil, who recently became a fully qualified dog trainer, and his colleagues within Dog Section wasted no time in identifying a replacement dog.
Then using his recently acquired skills he and his colleagues from Dog Section were able to train Sean's new dog, Atze, within five weeks, saving the Force approximately 12,000 - the cost of training a new Police dog.
Usually the dog and handler would need to complete an initial course under the guidance of an approved instructor at a training centre.
Sgt Niall MacLean, Head of the Police Dog Section said: "Skye was due to retire next year and we had planned to obtain a young puppy which would step into Skye's role once it had completed its training, however due to her death we needed to source an older dog which could start training immediately.
"This search took us the entire length of the UK and we eventually sourced one from German shepherd breeders in the North of England, who had imported some dogs from working stock in Germany. This was a big advantage as our new dog comes from a very good background."
Sgt MacLean added: "It usually takes 12 weeks to complete the dog's initial training; however we managed to complete this in half that time. Much of the training requires the input of two or more people to complete it, and in a small section with ongoing operational commitments this took a big team effort and I am delighted with the end result."

PC McNeil said "It was sad that we lost Skye but I am delighted with my new dog, he has shown a lot of promise.
"I have recently completed my instructor's course which meant we could complete the training without the need to attend a training centre. We have recently gone fully operational and hopefully over the next few years we can achieve some good results."

submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA
 


In Loving Memory of
K9 STORMY
February 23, 2010

Handler: Maj. Pete Eliadis
Prince George's County Police
Special Operations Division
Roberto L. Hylton-Chief of Police
7600 Barlowe Road
Landover, Maryland 20785
301-772-4420
Police_Chief@co.pg.md.us

Police Mark Passing of First Narcotics Dog
Prince George's County Police are mourning the loss of Stormy, the narcotics division's first drug detection dog. Stormy passed away Feb. 23. Stormy, who started in Oct. 1999, was credited with conducting approximately 3,000 drug searches during her career, resulting drug seizures valued at $26 million.
Her largest single drug seizure was approximately 900 pounds of marijuana, police said. Stormy and her handler, now-Maj. Pete Eliadis, transferred to the Special Operations Division in Nov. 2003. Stormy also helped out in various regional task forces, including work with the DEA, FBI  , Postal Service and ICE. Stormy retired from service in Jan. 2007. She was the only K-9 in the history of the Department to work with her partner through the ranks from Corporal to Lieutenant.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA