Memorials to Fallen K-9s
 2009-S
The F.A.S.T. Co. donates sets of memorial cards to all partners 
 I need your help to inform me of such losses.

Dept. addresses available for those who want to send condolences to officers. See below

In Loving Memory of
K9 SHILOH
June 7, 2009

Handler:
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources
Jamestown Fire Department Water Rescue Unit

K9 Shiloh drowned in Lake Cumberland as his handler investigated a boating accident involving a houseboat at the Jamestown Marina on Lake Cumberland. After tying up in one of the boat slips his handler boarded the houseboat to speak with the occupants as part of the investigation. As he prepared to finish the investigation one of the occupants informed him that Shiloh was attempting to get out of his patrol boat. As he returned to his boat to check on Shiloh, the woman's daughter informed him that Shiloh jumped into the water after she released his collar because she believed he was choking. Shiloh's handler immediately ran to his boat and pushed it out of the slip, believing Shiloh was trapped between the boat and the dock. Despite searching the area for over one hour Shiloh was not recovered until a week later by the Jamestown Fire Department Water Rescue Unit.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 SKY
December 29, 2009

Handler: Annette Sawyer
Search & Rescue

Scotland

Sad farewell to rescue dog Sky

Berkshire Search and Rescue has said a sad farewell to loyal search dog Sky who died just after Christmas. The Australian Kelpie, who has been a member of the team since 2004, was owned and looked after by Annette and Tom Sawyer. The couple said of her: “It was the summer of 1999 when we had set out to look for a chocolate Labrador and came home from a holiday in Scotland with a red and tan Australian Kelpie called Sky. “With her beautiful red hair, amber eyes and white toes she won our hearts at first sight. We looked for ways to keep her busy, someone said try agility with her.”
They continued: “We then turned our attention to search and rescue and in 2004 Sky passed her first operational assessment allowing her to search for missing people on behalf of the police.  “She answered more than 50 calls for help over her years of service and took part in three searches that saved lives. “She spent her summer months attending shows, giving demonstrations and going to schools helping nervous children to trust dogs. All she asked in return was that she got to play with her favourite squeaky toy. “She was full of life and full of love.
She went to sleep in our arms in our front room on the Tuesday (December 29) morning. Her brothers and sisters then all spent time with us both, having a quiet cuddle with her.” Sky was cremated with full honours in her search and rescue coat with her favourite toy.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 SAM
date   2009

Handler:  David Lane    
Dillon Police Department
Dillon, SC
phone: 848 774 0051

waiting for info from handler


In Loving Memory of
K9 SEM
June 28, 2009

Handler:
Officer William Jones
Three Rivers Police Department

Gallahar St & Highway 72
Three Rivers, TX 78071
(361) 786-2743

Three Rivers K-9 officer “Sem” died on Sunday, June 28, at approximately 2 a.m. Her cause of death is pending toxicology reports.
According to the Live Oak County complaint log, Sem’s partner, Three Rivers Police Officer William Jones, advised dispatchers at 1:41 a.m. that his K-9 officer was “non-responsive.” Guardian EMS was paged to the Three Rivers Fire Department “Code 3” to transport Sem to Williams Veterinary Clinic in Beeville. Bee County police and sheriff’s officers shut down intersections in Beeville for EMS to pass safely and quickly through town to the vet clinic. “CPR in progress,” read the report; however, Sem did not make it. Sem was a 2 -year-old Belgian Malinois. She was about to have her first anniversary with the Three Rivers Police Department, according to the report.
Dr. Gary Williams from Williams Vet Clinic said, “We have sent blood samples to Texas A&M and asked them to perform toxicology tests. The reports are not in, the case is still under investigation. However, my suspicion was heat stroke. We had three dogs that I suspect died of heat stroke that
week. These three deaths occurred within three days of each other; it had been extremely hot that week. The police officer [William Jones] is concerned about the possibility of someone poisoning the K-9 and we have not ruled that out.” Three Rivers police officer Jones was not available for comment.
Whether or not Sem died from heat stroke, I can tell you that heat stroke cases are only going to get worse, Williams said. Please remind the public to protect their animals. “Provide shade, get a kiddie pool or a galvanized water trough and put it in the ground halfway. Shade and lots of water are crucial for all outdoor pets,” Williams said.


In Loving Memory of
MWD K9 SANTO
June 19, 2009


Handler: Cpl. Donald R. Paldino

Marine Corps Base Quantico
Virginia
 
Military Police honor team member
Santo, a canine with Military Police Company, Security Battalion, Quantico, received a Navy Achievement Medal on June 18 for his extensive work both here and as the first MWD deployed from here. Cpl. Richard Bock, dog handler with Military Police Co., Security Bn., accepted the award for Santo. Bock had been taking care of Santo since his former trainer left Security Bn. following his and Santo’s second deployment. 
Santo, a military working dog stationed here at Quantico, was awarded a Navy Achievement Medal at a ceremony on June 18. The same traits that led to his success as a working dog, combined with the ravages of old age, led to the sad decision to euthanize the dog on June 19. The 129-pound German shepherd, born in Czechoslovakia, became the first military working dog to deploy from Marine Corps Base Quantico in 2004 when he was sent to Iraq.  Staff Sgt. Dana L. Brown, the kennel master at Military Police Company, Security Battalion, chose Santo and his handler, Cpl. Donald R. Paldino, because of how well they worked together.
‘’[Santo] and his handler were an incredible team. They spent four years together and were a solid team all around,” said Brown. While at MCB Quantico, Santo performed more than 20,000 vehicle searches, 85 health and comfort inspections and 42 building searches. His nose also helped Marines in Iraq when he found a large weapons cache consisting of more than 2,000 7.62 rounds, 20 mortar rounds, 12 rocket propelled grenade rounds and various other bomb-making materials. He earned a reputation as the ‘’most feared dog in the kennel.”
“I trusted him just as much as I trusted any other Marine. When things go bad people have uncontrollable thoughts [about the situation]; a second of hesitation,” said Paldino, now a civilian working as the director of K9 operations for S.E.A.L. Security Solutions, a private security firm. “Most dogs don’t have that reaction, there’s no second thought. It’s ‘Do it because you’re told to do it, do it because you want to do it’ and that was the bottom line.” Santo’s exceptional sense of smell and aggressive nature gave the Marines deployed with him the confidence to complete the mission while patrolling the streets of Fallujah.
“I felt more secure [with Santo] — more importantly — I think the people I was attached to felt more secure,” said Paldino, of Oxford, Mass. “He had an unbelievable nose; he was really good at finding explosives. He gave everybody a sense of security, not just me.” A hip injury slowed Santo down after his first deployment but not enough to keep him from returning to Iraq in 2006 to help support the troops in Ramadi. Hip dysplasia, a common cause of arthritis in canines, and lumbosacral disease, a condition where the nerves and spinal cord become compressed as they pass through the lower spine, set in following Santo’s second deployment.
The ailments made it difficult for him to move around, said Brown. These injuries kept Santo from deploying again. Also, the same traits that earned Santo his NAM lead to his untimely death. ‘’We’ve been taking him out and grooming him, getting him some exercise [since his last deployment],” said Cpl. Richard Bock, who has been in charge of taking care of Santo since Paldino left Quantico. “He deserves this recognition,” said Brown. “He has been an amazing dog and definitely the most memorable in my 14 years in the military working dog field.” There is currently an effort to have Santo’s body preserved and added to the K9 exhibit at the Marine Corps History Museum at MCB Quantico.  submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA

In Loving Memory of
K9 SAMSON
June 2009

Handler:
Buncombe County Sheriff Department
202 Haywood St.
Asheville, NC  28801
828.250.6670  -  Patrol
(828) 250-4428

K9 dog to be buried with honors at new Candler pet cemetery

CANDLER — Best Friends Pet Cemetery and Crematory will be holding a grand opening ceremony, June 19. They will host a burial ceremony for “Sam” that day, a beloved local K9 police dog, in the ‘Service Animals” section of the pet cemetery. There will be a formal procession of fire fighters and law enforcement officers, beginning from Biltmore Square Mall at 1 p.m., to the pet cemetery on the grounds of Forest Lawn Memorial Cemetery at 1498 Sand Hill Road, Candler. After a former dedication, the Chaplain will bless the new cemetery and then lead the prayer and graveside service. The National Anthem will be sung and taps will be played by the Buncombe County Honor Guard during the presentation of the Honor Colors. The ceremony will end with a Memorial White Dove release.  Speakers include Sheriff Van Duncan, Sheriff of Buncombe County, and Sheriff Rick Davis, of Henderson County. 
Release RSVP, or contact Patrick or Ginger Bradley @ (828) 665-4303 for more information.
  submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA

Samson's service - photo by Erin Brethauer ( ebrethau@citizen-times.com )
Members of the police K9 units gathered Friday with their dogs to honor Sampson, a local K9 police dog was laid to rest in a new pet cemetery called Best Friends at Forest Lawn Memorial Cemetery in Candler. 6/19/09 - Erin Brethaue
 


In Loving Memory of
K9 SKOOCH
March 26, 2009
 
Handler/Partner:  Ofc. Dave Burkle
cruvo@phillyburbs.com <cruvo@phillyburbs.com>
Upper Moreland Police Department

117 Park Ave. #1
Willow Grove, PA
PH: 215 659.1600

Officer missing K9 partner  PhillyBurbs.com
Levittown - With the death of its 9-year-old police dog Skooch, the township must determine if there are funds for a replacement. His name was Skooch. And while that's a shortened version of an Italian phrase that essentially means "pain in the butt," he was anything but, says police Officer Dave Burkle.Sadly, Skooch, a German shepherd who was Burkle's partner in Upper Moreland for eight years, passed away at the end of March. He was 9 years old. "He was an exceptionally friendly dog," said Burkle. "He could be aggressive when the time came, but he had an on/off switch. The next minute a kid could pet him and he would just sit there and let him." Skooch was put down March 26. Cancer was the cause. He had a tumor in his nose and masses in his stomach. Burkle had hoped initial treatments would cure the pooch, but in the end they weren't enough. Upper Moreland Lt. Alex Levy said the department tries to plan ahead to replace police dogs once they reach the 10-year-old range, but Skooch died unexpectedly early. It's not in the department's budget to replace Skooch this year, but police are considering ways to generate the funds. The cost to buy a new dog and train it could be as much as $18,000, said Burkle. Upper Moreland police have three other K9 units. The department has a deal with the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in which it pays about $800 annually per dog to have the animals' health care covered, he said. Burkle and Skooch started working together on Sept. 10, 2001, after Burkle bought Skooch in North Carolina. Skooch was bred in the Czech Republic. Skooch and Burkle developed a strong bond as they responded to hundreds of calls over the years. "You always knew he had your back," said Burkle. Skooch was trained in routine patrol duties, such as tracking robbers and burglars who ran from crime scenes. But his specialty was sniffing out bombs and explosives. Together, Skooch and Burkle searched businesses and schools in Montgomery and Bucks counties to ensure they were safe following bomb threats.Skooch once located a man on the run who was hiding in bushes. He also sniffed out a retail thief who fled in Abington.Burkle explained that Skooch got his unique name from an Italian saying he learned from his wife's family that means pain in the butt. "All dogs can be pains," Burkle said with a good-natured laugh. "That's the name we gave him."Skooch lived with Burkle, a police officer for 35 years. The veteran cop said it's not just the patrols he misses, but the quieter times too, like when he'd give Skooch a bit of meat from his sandwich at lunch. "I miss him. I'm a little lost without him," Burkle said. Christopher Ruvo can be reached at 215-345-3147 or cruvo@phillyburbs.com.

another article about K9 SKOOCH

Bucks County Courier Times
His name was Skooch. And while that's a shortened version of an Italian phrase that essentially means "pain in the butt," he was anything but, says police Officer Dave Burkle.  Sadly, Skooch, a German shepherd who was Burkle's partner in Upper Moreland for eight years, passed away at the end of March. He was 9 years old. "He was an exceptionally friendly dog," said Burkle. "He could be aggressive when the time came, but he had an on/off switch. The next minute a kid could pet him and he would just sit there and let him." Skooch was put down March 26. Cancer was the cause. He had a tumor in his nose and masses in his stomach. Burkle had hoped initial treatments would cure the pooch, but in the end they weren't enough. pper Moreland Lt. Alex Levy said the department tries to plan ahead to replace police dogs once they reach the 10-year-old range, but Skooch died unexpectedly early. It's not in the department's budget to replace Skooch this year, but police are considering ways to generate the funds. The cost to buy a new dog and train it could be as much as $18,000, said Burkle. Upper Moreland police have three other K9 units. The department has a deal with the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in which it pays about $800 annually per dog to have the animals' health care covered, he said.

Burkle and Skooch started working together on Sept. 10, 2001, after Burkle bought Skooch in North Carolina. Skooch was bred in the Czech Republic. Skooch and Burkle developed a strong bond as they responded to hundreds of calls over the years. "You always knew he had your back," said Burkle. Skooch was trained in routine patrol duties, such as tracking robbers and burglars who ran from crime scenes. But his specialty was sniffing out bombs and explosives. Together, Skooch and Burkle searched businesses and schools in Montgomery and Bucks counties to ensure they were safe following bomb threats.  Skooch once located a man on the run who was hiding in bushes. He also sniffed out a retail thief who fled in Abington. Burkle explained that Skooch got his unique name from an Italian saying he learned from his wife's family that means pain in the butt. "All dogs can be pains," Burkle said with a good-natured laugh. "That's the name we gave him. "Skooch lived with Burkle, a police officer for 35 years. The veteran cop said it's not just the patrols he misses, but the quieter times too, like when he'd give Skooch a bit of meat from his sandwich at lunch. "I miss him. I'm a little lost without him," Burkle said.

April 16, 2009 02:20 AM.     submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA

In Loving Memory of
K9 SAMPSON

March 18, 2009
Fayette County Sheriff’s Office
P.O. Box 509
100 Church Street
Fayetteville, WV  25840
304-574-4304  -  Fax: 304-574-2796
 
Bomb-sniffing police K-9 dies of cancer - department needs $16,000 for new dog
Fayette County sheriff’s Deputy Nick Mooney said his K-9 partner Sampson was more than a dog. The 8-year-old golden retriever found  missing people, tracked armed robbery suspects in a swamp, and dangerous situations of any kind — even those involving a possible bomb — did not faze him. At the same time, he was a cuddly, furry friend for pre-schoolers and police officers alike. But Wednesday, Mooney arrived home to find out his partner and best friend had died.Sampson, Fayette County’s first bomb-sniffing dog and a K-9 since 2002, died at Mooney’s residence. Sgt. Mike Fridley, K-9 supervisor, said an autopsy later determined Sampson died of cancer. Because of their extremely high drive, cancer in police K-9s is rarely detected until the most severe stages — if detected at all. “It was just like he wore the uniform and drove the cruiser like we do,”
Mooney said. “I wonder if he could have really done it. He was just that amazing.”Mooney became Sampson’s handler about two years ago after Cpl. Steve Gray, the previous handler, was called to active military duty.
Sampson was a dual-purpose dog trained for explosives detection and tracking, and other jurisdictions frequently utilized him, Mooney said. Recently, Mooney and Sampson were called to help pursue a Greenbrier County armed robbery suspect who had fled to Meadow Bridge. For 3 miles and in the dark, both deputy and dog followed a path that led them over paved roadways, through a farm property’s fieldand into a swamp.

Water reached Mooney’s gun belt, and he had to get both himself and Sampson out for safety reasons.
 Mooney said police later  caught the suspect, who told officers, “I thought you had me when I saw that golden retriever and the deputy in the swamp. You were so close.” Sampson was also a hit with youngsters, Mooney said. A 3-year-old preschooler was once knocked down by Sampson’s “notoriously” heavy tail. Sampson then ran to the boy, licking him like he was checking to see if the child was OK. The boy, unhurt, got up and wanted to play with the friendly dog.Often, citizens do not fully realize what K-9s do to serve them, Mooney said. “If you need them, they’re there for you. That’s all they want to do,” he said. “A lot of people think they’re only drug or bite ogs. They don’t think of the teenage girl whose grandpa with Alzheimer’s is missing. Our K-9 teams would help find him.” Mooney said the department intends to purchase another bomb-sniffing dog. However, it must raise donated funds, as it did to purchase Sampson. This time, the estimated cost is
$16,000. That includes the dog, plus all necessary training and equipment.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA

In Loving Memory of
K9 SWANEY
February 20, 2009

Handler: Corporal Scott Searcy

Davidson Police Department
216 S. Main St.
P.O. Box 579
Davidson, NC 28036
Ph: 704 892-5131  Fx: 704 896-9733
WEBSITE - http://www.ci.davidson.nc.us/index.asp?nid=126


Town's police dog Swaney dies at age 12

The Davidson Police Department is sad to report that Swaney, the department’s canine for 11 years, has died. K9 Swaney was recruited in winter 1998 and was named in honor of Davidson Police Officer Mark Swaney, who died in the line of duty on Dec. 25, 1997. K9 Swaney partnered with Police Corporal Scott Searcy, who has been a Davidson police officer since 1996. When not working, K9 Swaney lived with Corporal Searcy. They were partners until 2007, when after almost nine years of public service, Swaney retired from active duty. He continued with public appearances and demonstrations, especially in Davidson schools, where he was always loved and hugged by the children. K9 Swaney was a “generalist” police dog, able to do narcotics detection, searches and aggression work. K9 Swaney was recently diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer. “He lived his life valiantly, and exemplified the phrase, ‘When I was called, I gave my all,’” Chief Jeanne Miller said in a press release Saturday. “He will be missed.” Details of a public recognition of K9 Swaney will be forthcoming.  submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA