Memorials to Fallen K-9s
 2008-H
The F.A.S.T. Co. donates sets of memorial cards to all partners 
 I need your help to inform me of such losses.

Dept. addresses available for those who want to send condolences to officers. See below
In Loving Memory of
K9 HANS
date?

Handler:
Atlantic City Police Department

 (need data)..


In Loving Memory of
K9 HISSO

December 25, 2008
Handler: Officer Bill Sombo 
North Huntingdon Police Department
11279 Center Hwy
Huntingdon, PA 15642
(724)863-8800

Church Service Honors K-9 Who Was Put Down - K-9 Hisso Served North Huntingdon For 8 Years
More than 40 police departments from several counties were represented Tuesday morning at a church service to remember a North Huntingdon K-9 that had to be put down in Westmoreland County. Doctors said that Hisso, a 10-year-old German shepherd, had a brain tumor that was causing seizures and other severe neurological problems. "He's more than just a dog," said Hisso's handler, Officer Bill Sombo. "He's a police officer. He's your partner. He's with you on the shift the whole time. This was just sudden. I was going to be phasing Hisso out, but he was still actively working the street." The police dog had served in North Huntingdon since December 2000. He helped patrol ground zero shortly after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in New York. "He served this community like any one of the other officers would have. It's just that he had four legs. He was able to track them a lot faster than we are," said Sombo. "Quite a few tracks with him -- successful tracks -- armed robberies, bank robberies, couple Alzheimer's patients that were tracked and recovered."

The memorial for Hisso began at 9 a.m. at the North Huntingdon Police Department headquarters on Center Highway. Police officers proceeded through Trafford to Christian Life Church on Seventh Street for the service at 10 a.m. "Hisso was not just a pet, but a police officer and a partner," Pastor Gary Simpson said. Hisso was one of three K-9s in the department. A replacement is in training and will likely begin working in the spring, Nicotra reported. "He's going to be missed. He was good dog, a real good dog," said Sombo. 
 
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 HARLEY

November 11, 2008
 
Handler: Officer Donald Morgan
Seymour Police Department
102 West California
Seymour, Texas 76380
(940)889-8888
Famous drug hound dies
Harley, the “No. 1 dope dog in the state” made famous by a Shooter Jennings song, has died of natural causes at age 12. Harley’s former boss, Seymour Police Chief Tommy Duncan, said they are collecting donations for a plaque to honor the dog’s contributions to that city’s crime-fighting efforts. “He made numerous arrests,” Duncan said. “A lot of those drug dealers sure hated Harley.” Harley captured the imagination of country fans everywhere after being instrumental in busting Jennings while he was en route to a concert in Wichita Falls from Lubbock in 2003.  In the song “Busted in Baylor County,” Jennings sings that he was smoking some “California gold” and was speeding. He was pulled over by law enforcement officials in Baylor County and thought his marijuana was stashed out of range of detection. But his hiding place was no match for Harley. Duncan said after the Belgian Malinois’ death Nov. 11, he was buried on private property, but the police department wanted some way to recognize Harley.“It’s probably going to cost about $450 for a nice bronze plaque to put on the wall at the police department,” Duncan said. “Drug dogs are actually police officers, and he was a good one.” Harley worked for the Seymour Police Department from 2001 until 2005, finding stashes of drugs and keeping those substances off the streets of North Texas with a wave of his paw. “Harley was trained ‘aggressive’ and he would start scratching at wherever the drugs were,” Duncan said.Duncan said Harley won a competition with his handler, Donald Morgan, at a state police dog event, garnering him the title “No. 1 dope dog in the state.” Besides the win and the bust described in Jennings’ song, Duncan said law enforcement officials across the state knew Harley was the top dog when it came to finding drugs in and around Seymour — an area crisscrossed by five different small highways. “In one story I heard, the DEA got behind a vehicle near El Paso and they knew they had a big shipment (of drugs) but they followed the vehicle until they got to Baylor County. They waited because they knew Harley was good and would find the drugs,” Duncan said. “A lot of the drug traffic will come through here instead of on the major highways.” Harley even had a bit of Hollywood fame — Duncan said the song “Busted in Baylor County” is featured in the 2005 movie “Dukes of Hazzard.” The film is based on a 1979 TV series of the same name whose theme song was written by Jennings’ singer/songwriter father, the late Waylon Jennings.Harley retired from active duty in 2005, because Duncan said arthritis in the dog’s hips made it hard for him to get into areas where drugs are normally found. Harley’s successor, Panther, a female Belgian Malinois named after Seymour’s school mascot, is currently filling the large paw prints left by Harley. “She’s learning pretty good, she’s a good dog — maybe we can catch another star,” Duncan said with a laugh. “I think Willie Nelson is next on the list.”  submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA

In Loving Memory of
K9 HECTOR
October 13, 2008

Handler: Mike Hiatt
Lafayette Sheriff's Department
(337) 232-9211
316 West Main Street,
Lafayette, LA 70501
Police Station Address:PO DRAWER 3508, Lafayette, LA
phone: (337) 232-9211 - Fax: (337) 236-3967

Hector served two years with the Lafayette Parish Sheriff’s Office
On Sunday October 12, at approximately 11:25pm K-9 Deputy Hector with the Lafayette Sheriff’s Office and his handler had just completed a building check in the 2600 Block of Cameron Street. As they were walking back to their unit a vehicle came up from behind them and struck K-9 Hector and his partner. The impact through both to the ground, the vehicle never stopped and fled east on Cameron Street. K-9 Hector died at the scene due to his injuries, his handler sustained minor injuries and was treated and released. On Tuesday Morning October 14, 2008 Lafayette Parish Sheriff’s Deputies arrested 39 year old Nick Thomas of Lafayette for the Hit and Run accident that killed K-9 Deputy Hector.
Lt. Craig Stansbury
Public Information Officer
Lafayette Parish Sheriff's Office
Phone-236-5876
****************************
Service: 10/15/08 - Fallen K9 deputy remembered with memorial
- Leslie Westbrook • lwestbrook@theadvertiser.com • October 16, 2008
 Buzz up! Lafayette Sheriff's Deputy Michael Hiatt solemnly led his fellow officers and their playful, barking K9s to the spot Wednesday where a hit-and-run driver killed his four-legged partner, Hector, on Sunday night. An American flag supported by two extended firetruck ladders waved over the line of police cars, motorcycles and the mass of police officers, friends and family members gathered on Cameron Street to support Hiatt and remember Hector for his two years of service. "It's our tribute to everything he's given back to the Sheriff's Office and the city of Lafayette," said Lt. Craig Stansbury of the Lafayette Parish Sheriff's Office. Hiatt, his wife, Jackie, and 20-month-old son, Kaden, accepted a memorial wreath from Sheriff Mike Neustrom and placed it at the spot of the accident. Stansbury said this was the first time in his recollection that the Sheriff's Office has had a K9 die in the line of duty. Hiatt and Hector were both hit by a hit-and-run driver Sunday night while doing a routine check at the Entergy Power Plant on Cameron Street. Hector died at the scene. Hiatt was treated for minor injuries and released. Stansbury said a suspect in the hit-and-run, Nick Thomas, 39, of Lafayette, was arrested Tuesday morning. "Hector lived in the house," Hiatt said after a memorial service at Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic Church in Scott. "We were one big family. "You form a bond, and they're with you and they protect you and they sleep in the bed with you, and you know," Hiatt said, "It's like losing a kid."
******************************************
Lafayette Parish Sheriff's Deputy Michael Hiatt kneels down after hanging a memorial wreath for his K-9, Hector, during a memorial service Wednesday on Cameron Street, in Lafayette near the spot where the dog was killed in the line of duty Sunday night by a hit-and-run driver. (Leslie Westbrook/lwestbrook@theadvertiser.com)
UPDATE:
Suspect booked in K-9 hit-and-run death   10/16/08  Louisiana
Authorities arrested a Lafayette man Tuesday allegedly at fault in a hit-and-run incident that killed a Lafayette Parish Sheriff’s Office K-9 deputy and injured its handler. Lt. Craig Stansbury, spokesman for the Sheriff’s Office, said Nick Thomas, 39, was arrested on charges of hit-and-run with injury, negligent injury and reckless operation. Thomas allegedly struck the police dog Hector — a Belgian Melanois — and his handler, who was not identified, after the two finished conducting a building check on Cameron Street on Sunday night. The handler suffered minor injuries in the incident and was treated and released from a local hospital. The dog died at the scene. On Monday, authorities asked for help in locating a black Mercedes seen in the area that night. Stansbury said a sheriff’s deputy spotted a black Mercedes Tuesday morning at the Diamond Lakes apartment complex. The deputy checked the vehicle and saw physical evidence on the vehicle matched evidence found at the scene of the crime. Afterward, Stansbury said, authorities arrested Thomas and booked him into the Lafayette Parish Correctional Center.Stansbury said Thomas likely will not face any additional charges for Hector’s death because “you would have to prove intent.” “From all the evidence that we have so far it was more like a hit-and-run type of an accident,” Stansbury said. “There was no evidence to prove intent to harm that we can see at this point.  submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA
Memorial service for K9 Hector
   
Lafayette Sheriff's Deputy Michael Hiatt solemnly led his fellow officers and their playful, barking K9s to the spot Wednesday where a hit-and-run driver killed his four-legged partner, Hector, on Sunday night. An American flag supported by two extended firetruck ladders waved over the line of police cars, motorcycles and the mass of police officers, friends and family members gathered on Cameron Street to support Hiatt and remember Hector for his two years of service. "It's our tribute to everything he's given back to the Sheriff's Office and the city of Lafayette," said Lt. Craig Stansbury of the Lafayette Parish Sheriff's Office.  Hiatt, his wife, Jackie, and 20-month-old son, Kaden, accepted a memorial wreath from Sheriff Mike Neustrom and placed it at the spot of the accident. Stansbury said this was the first time in his recollection that the Sheriff's Office has had a K9 die in the line of duty. Hiatt and Hector were both hit by a hit-and-run driver Sunday night while doing a routine check at the Entergy Power Plant on Cameron Street. Hector died at the scene. Hiatt was treated for minor injuries and released. Stansbury said a suspect in the hit-and-run, Nick Thomas, 39, of Lafayette, was arrested Tuesday morning. "Hector lived in the house," Hiatt said after a memorial service at Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic Church in Scott. "We were one big family. "You form a bond, and they're with you and they protect you and they sleep in the bed with you, and you know," Hiatt said, "It's like losing a kid."


In Loving Memory of
K9 HANK
 September 23, 2008
.jpg? HANDLER ?
Burleson Police Department
225 W Renfro St
Burleson, TX 76028
(817) 295-7146
To: sbolton@burlesontx.com  ???
 
In Loving Memory of
MWD CHIEF K9 HAWK
October 3, 2008

Handler: Boatswain's Mate 2 Sandor Csitar
United States Coast Guard
California
 
http://abclocal.go.com/kgo/story?section=news/local/east_bay&id=6429089

Coast Guard bids sad farewell to Hawk
The yellow labrador, outfitted in a badged U.S. Coast Guard vest, stood smiling that friendly lab smile at his retirement ceremony Thursday. The picnic table in the park area at Coast Guard Island, Alameda, was set with the usual outdoor party fare of hot dogs and chips and soft drinks, but most of the roughly 100 people weren't snacking. Hawk, his front leg occasionally involuntarily folding inward, remained happily near his steady companion and handler, Boatswain's Mate 2 Sandor Csitar, who, by the end of the ceremony, was unable to speak when the moment came to make his address. By then, the words and memorial gifts from his Coast Guard peers, Alameda and Oakland police departments and other law enforcement agencies had moved Csitar to tears. He beckoned to Coast Guard Lt. Cmdr. Greg Thomas, who stepped to Csitar's side, patted his shoulder, and said a few words for him. "Words can't express our loss, or our joy,"  Thomas said. At age 6, Hawk is retiring from his service as an explosives-search dog. Such occasions are not always so emotional, but Hawk has been diagnosed with terminal brain cancer, and this day of honor came one day before he would be euthanized at Travis Air Force Base, "before his quality of life further diminished." The gentle dog has in his four-year career found fireworks, submachine guns, handguns, live artillery and narcotics. He has searched baggage, freight, aircraft, piers, people and buildings to protect former presidents and foreign dignitaries. He took a trip to New Orleans where he searched through facilities. Hawk first met Csitar in 2004 after being trained in search and rescue. His trainer donated him to the Customs and Border Protection training center in 2003. The two trained together for four months and Hawk officially went to work with Csitar on  Dec. 23, 2004. Csitar said, of the many memories of working with Hawk, among the best were when he worked with other law enforcement agencies, such as Alameda, Oakland and Berkeley police and the county sheriff's office. Besides the benefit of learning more ways to handle canine service dogs, it was the camaraderie, he said, gesturing toward several attending officers from those police departments. Before the addresses began on the lawn, Csitar looked down as someone kneeled and petted Hawk, who gladly accepted the stranger's touch. "He has no problem being gentle," Csitar said. "He's got nothing but gentle." Csitar's 10-year-old stepson, Steel Jones, came up to stoke Hawk, who clearly was enjoying the visits from family and strangers. Speaking of Hawk after the ceremony, Thomas said, "He literally worked himself to death for us."  Coast Guard Chief Clifford Fuller recalled his first meeting with Hawk. "Three years ago when I first reported to Alameda for duty and saw the Canine Team was under my supervision, Sandor introduced me to Hawk, and Hawk (got up on his hind legs) and shed all over me," Fuller said. "I didn't know there was fur on my uniform and when I went to the CEO's office later, he said. 'I didn't know we had mohair uniforms.'" "If someone decided to have a good Samaritan hanging around, they put him in the right place at the right time. He's one of those people who always helps out, whether it has anything to do with the Coast Guard or not," Fuller said of Csitar. Hawk was awarded a citation of outstanding achievement for his work. After noting the details of his service, the document notes his presence after hurricanes Katrina and Rita. "As a direct result of his positive attitude and unfailing spirit, his role as a canine was invaluable providing much needed stress relief and positive reinforcement to rescue workers, displaced families and distraught children in the area," the citation says. After the speeches and awards, Hawk quietly lay on the grass, again enjoying the company of his young friend Steel. 
Chief Hawk was put down....   A very SAD DAY for all.

submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 HEIKE
August 27, 2008

Handler: – UNDERCOVER
Coral Springs Police Department
2801 Coral Springs Dr
Coral Springs, FL 33065
(954) 346-1200

Coral Springs police dog dies after left in hot car
A Coral Springs police dog trained to sniff out narcotics has died after it was shut inside a broiling, unmarked police car, authorities said today. Hieke, an 8-year-old wire-haired terrier and Labrador mix, was left inside the car for about two hours while it wasn't running Wednesday, said police spokesman Sgt. Joe McHugh. The handler, an undercover narcotics officer, found the animal dead about 2:45 p.m. Wednesday. Marked police cruisers that are used to transport K-9s typically have alarms that sound if the temperature inside the car goes too high. McHugh said the vehicle also had an alarm, but it didn't go off. It was unclear why the officer left the dog inside the vehicle while it was not running. No further details about the incident were available. Police are not releasing the handler's name because he works undercover, McHugh said. "It appears to be an accident," McHugh said. "The officer is extremely disraught and upset." McHugh said the officer has been a K-9 handler for 14 years. Police are conducting an internal investigation to determine how the dog died and if there was any negligence. The officer has not been placed on leave, McHugh said. "We are investigating this case like every other one we would investigate if someone left their own dog in the car," McHugh said. The officer was on-duty, working a case, when the dog died, McHugh said. It's the second police dog death in Broward County in as many months. On July 17, Oozi, a Broward sheriff's dog, was shot to death in Miami Beach after a suspect accused of assaulting his girlfriend led police on a car chase into North Miami-Dade County. In November 2006, Astro, the K-9 partner of a Port Everglades bomb squad detective, died when the air conditioning failed in a car the male Belgian Malinois was left in.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA

follow-up...........
K9 Cop Won't Face Criminal Charges In Dog's Death - Dog Died In August
A Coral Springs Police detective, whose police dog died inside his handler's unmarked police car, will not face criminal charges by the Broward State Attorney's Office, according to Coral Springs police. The police dog, named Hieke, was a narcotics detection dog who died on August 27th, 2008 in the rear of the police vehicle. An investigation revealed that the vehicle was not running and the dog succumbed to the heat. The officer was on-duty, working a case, when the dog died, according to police spokesman Sgt. Joe McHugh. K-9 police cars are usually equipped with alarms that go off if the temperature inside gets too hot, but for some reason, the alarm in this vehicle didn't go off. While the State Attorney's office has decided not to prosecute, the Coral Springs Police Department is still conducting an internal investigation concerning the circumstances surrounding the death of the police dog. That investigation is expected to be completed shortly.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA

EXTRA
The Coral Springs K-9 Unit currently has four officers along with their canine partners. Every K-9 team is certified yearly with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, the North American Police Work Dog Association, and the National Narcotic Detector Dog Association. The primary duties of the K-9 Unit are to assist the Patrol Division during in-progress felony calls by conducting building searches, area searches, tracks and by apprehending fleeing suspects. In addition, all of our canine teams are duel certified in Patrol and Narcotics Detection and conduct narcotics searches when needed. The K-9 Unit also performs demonstrations for special events throughout Broward County, and assists other agencies when requested.  The K-9 Unit is headed by Sergeant Brad Mock. He can be reached at (954) 346-1761 or via e-mail pddbm@coralsprings.org.
UPDATE
Officer suspended in death of K-9
A Coral Springs police officer whose dog died after he accidentally left it in his police car has been suspended for three days without pay. The officer, who was not identified because he works undercover, says he thought he had taken the dog to the kennel on Aug 27. When he went to get Hieke, a 9-year-old narcotics dog, from the kennel and she wasn't there he found her dead in the car. Authorities say she was in the car for about four hours. The state attorney's office is not prosecuting.
 


In Loving Memory of
K9 HAITO
October 9, 2002  - June 24, 2008
    
Handler: Cpl. Joseph Krajewski
New Castle County Police Department
3601 N. Dupont HY
New Castle, DE 19720
Non-Emergency Police Service -  302-573-2800
.NCCO police mourn loss of K-9 Haito
    New Castle County police are mourning the loss of police K-9 Haito, a retired member of their force, who was euthanized today because he had cancer.  The German shepherd was forced to retire last year after a 4-year police career. Haito was 5 1/2 years old and hailed from Germany. Prior to his death, Haito and his handler, Cpl. Joseph Krajewski, spent his final hours playing ball at Carousel Farm with several other police canines and their officers from surrounding police agencies. “Haito wasn’t getting around very well because of the untreatable tumor,” said police spokesman, Cpl.Trinidad Navarro. “He wanted to work and was excited to hear his handler say kennel up, which means get into the car to go to work.” During his police career, Haito worked in tandem in “D” squad with K-9 Nike. Haito made 14 apprehensions and seized more than $41,000 in drug seizures in 2006, and five apprehensions and $4,000 in drug seizures his last year on the job. Haito lived in retirement with his handler Krajewski and his family. “He was whining last night and looking at him with that look in his eye that you knew it was time,”  Navarro said. “He was the best of the best.”
submitted by Dawn Lanhan
- Contact Terri Sanginiti at 324-2771 or tsanginiti@delawareonline.com
MORE
Police Canine Passes Away Peacefully
New Castle County Police Canine “Haito” passed away peacefully today with his handler and his family by his side.  He spent his final hours this morning playing “ball” with his partner and several other police canine officers from a number of surrounding police agencies.  Even though he was in constant discomfort, Haito remained dedicated to his partner and still wanted to “work.”  He was still excited to hear his handler say, “kennel up,” which means get into the car in order to go to work. Haito served as a narcotics and patrol canine officer with his partner, Corporal Joseph Krajewski from 2004 until 2007 when he was forced into early retirement due to a large “untreatable” tumor.  Haito spent the past several months with Corporal Krajewski and his family.  According the many of canine officers, Haito was a “super” dog that remained dedicated to our mission as police officers.  He remained heroic to the very end.  Our thoughts and prayers are extended to Corporal Krajewski and his family.
submitted by Dawn Lanham