Memorials to Fallen K-9s 
 2006-N
The F.A.S.T. Co. donates sets of memorial cards to all partners 

 I need your help to inform me of such losses.

Dept. addresses available for those who want to send condolences to officers. See below
In Loving Memory of 
K-9 NERO 
March 14, 2006 


Handler: Officer Jim Bartley 
Bellevue Police Department 
2207 Washington St. 
Bellevue, NE  68005  -  402 293.3100 

Our Department started its K-9 Unit in 1995 with a Dutch Shepard (Holland Herder) named Nero.  Nero was a dual purpose dog and was assigned to Officer Jim Bartley.  Nero was a fantastic dog and was a critical factor to the success of our K-9 Unit to this day.  Nero died in 2001.  We did have a service.  Officer Bartley was then partnered with Blitz in January of 2002.  Blitz was also a dual purpose dog and was 4 years old at the time of acquisition.  Blitz was a Belgian Malinois and came from Europe.  Blitz was put to sleep in March 2006 because of medical problems.I have attached a photo of Blitz and Officer Bartley.  If you need any more, please let me know.  Thank you for your efforts. submitted by Lt. Kurt M. Strachota -  K-9 Unit Commander - Bellevue Police Dept. 

Bellevue Police Dog Put Down 3/21/06 - NE  The Bellevue Police Department lost a valuable member of its police force last week.  Blitz, a member of the department's K-9 Unit since the late 1990s, was put to sleep March 14 after becoming too hard to control. Blitz had attacked his partner, officer Jim Bartley, Police Chief John Stacey Jr. said.  A neurological disorder common with the Belgian Shepherd Malinois breed is possibly to blame for the attack.  Blitz and Bartley worked together on many assignments. In early November, Blitz successfully took down a burglar who was uncooperative and wielding a knife.  The department is planning to retire another of its aging dogs, Falco, within the next year and a half, Stacey said.  When that happens, Bellevue's canine contingent will be down to two. Some business sponsors have stepped in, and the department should be able to replace one of the two dogs in the near future, Stacey said. But funding for a fourth dog still is uncertain, he said.  Bellevue has had a canine unit for at least 10 years, he said.  A dog is on duty at all times, he said. They are used primarily for two things: helping to catch suspects and detecting drugs.  "It's almost a daily basis now that we require a canine in some form," Stacey said.  For example, he said, dogs were called twice March 14 - once for a traffic stop and the second for a burglary in progress.  Dogs that are healthy and performing well usually can serve the department for up to 10 years, Stacey said. Getting a replacement dog can cost up to $10,000, including training and equipment costs, he said.  If funding is not found for a fourth dog, Stacey said, the department will scale back its K-9 Unit. "We can't support it on our own," he said.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA 


In Loving Memory of
  P.D. K-9 NITRO
January 23, 2006

Partner: Cst. Howard Rutter
Vancouver Police Department
312 Main Street, 
Vancouver, BC
Canada - V6A 2T2
headquarters: 2120 Cambie Street,
Vancouver, BC Canada ` V5Z 4N6 - Breed: German Shepherd - Weight: 35 Kgs. - Sex: Male
Colour: sable - Born: August 1997 - K-9 Cerified: 99-06-09
 

VPD loses a long time K9 in the line of duty

Vancouver Police are mourning the loss of one of their canine members. The dog ‘Nitro’ was killed Monday night while trying to catch a couple of car thieves.  He caught up to the pair as they jumped onto a freight train in New Westminster.  Nitro grabbed one of the men, but slipped and was run over by the train. Constable Tim Fanning says the dog will be missed. “Very sad, very sad, but he went out in a hail of glory,” Fanning said. Nitro had been on the force for nine years and was due to retire shortly and live with it's handler.
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VANCOUVER - A second person has been charged in connection with the foot chase which resulted in the death of Vancouver Police dog ‘Nitro’.   Nitro was killed last week after being struck by a train while chasing two alleged car thieves. One of the two suspects, 26 year old Greg Pete was arrested a short time after the incident, but the second suspect got away.  However, last night police found and arrested Pete’s younger brother, 24 year old Jeremy Pete. Vancouver Police allege Jeremy Pete was the suspect who jumped onto a moving box car, causing nitro to fall under the train to his death. Both men are facing a variety of charges. A formal ceremony in honour of Nitro is set for next week.
NITRO
Breed: German Shepherd
Weight: 35 Kgs.
Sex: Male
Colour: sable
Born: August 1997
K-9 Cerified: 99-06-09
Nitro is your friend and says: "No matter what a stranger tells you NEVER get into a car with someone you don't know."Nitro is two years old and has been recently certified as a police dog. He is looking forward to a long career protecting you and capturing bad guys. Nitro loves to play ball and spend time at home with his family. Nitro's service:Barks, yips and howls punctuate police dog funeral in Vancouver.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- Hundreds of police officers stood at attention as a funeral for one of their own was punctuated by howls and yips.  A cacophony of barking arose Monday as 92 police dog teams paraded past a shrine and urn containing the cremains of Nitro, a German shepherd that died in the line of duty two weeks earlier. Nitro's handler, Constable Howard Rutter and his wife Carolyn, son Matthew and daughter Megan sat in the front row in Seaforth Armouries and fought back tears for much of the 70 minute service, which included three eulogies and a multimedia production on an overhead screen. "There were so many times that I would be frustrated with Nitro and get mad at him, but all it took was him coming over and licking my face and all would be well again," Rutter wrote in a full-color printed tribute to police service dog No. 9755. The funeral was preceded by a motorcade of 60 police vehicles with lights flashing. Many of the dog teams in attendance were from police agencies in neighboring Washington state, including Seattle, Everett, Yakima and Monroe, Nitro's birthplace. Nitro, 8 1/2, a Vancouver police dog since 1999, died after lunging to grab a man sought for investigation of automobile theft, losing his grip and falling under the wheels of a train. By Sunday 185 messages of condolences had been posted on a police Web page set up for the dog.  The man Nitro grabbed, Greg Daniel Pete, 26, was arrested and charged with possession of stolen property over $5,000. In keeping with Vancouver police tradition, Nitro's ashes will be spread on each of the four corners of the city, so he can guard Vancouver even in his afterlife. (submitted by Annelabs@aol.com
Car thief handed 10 months in case that killed Nitro - Loss of dog not part of sentence, judge says  6/23/06

VANCOUVER -- A petty criminal whose name is now known to just about every police officer in the city was sentenced this week to one day in jail, plus credit for time served, for stealing a Honda Civic last January. Because the courts give double credit for time spent in custody, in effect Gregg Daniel Pete, who was in jail for five months before trial, got 10 months for stealing a car.  In a city where nightclub shootings, street-racing fatalities, kidnappings and home invasions grab the headlines, Mr. Pete's crime and punishment would have probably gone unnoticed -- except for the fact that a beloved police dog died on the case.  Vancouver Police Department spokesman Constable Howard Chow declined to comment on Mr. Pete's sentence yesterday, except to say that it brought some closure to a file that upset a lot of police officers. Nitro, a nine-year-old German shepherd who received his Vancouver Police Department badge in 1999, was killed when he slipped from a moving train as he pursued Mr. Pete and another man.  Last Jan. 23, Mr. Pete, 26, was spotted in a Honda Civic that had been reported stolen a few days earlier. While an unmarked car tracked the vehicle, dog handler Constable Howard Rutter and his assistant, Nitro, were called in for backup. Then the car thieves realized they were being followed and sped off through the streets until their car was trapped at a rail crossing in New Westminster.  "When a train blocked their escape route, they jumped out of the car and ran. Police dog Nitro was released and began chasing one of the men, who jumped up on the train. Nitro latched onto him, but the train began moving and he lost his grip. He was sucked under the train and died," a Vancouver Police account of the incident said. Mr. Pete was arrested at the scene. For days after, the shock of Nitro's death rippled through the police department. A ceremony to mark the dog's death drew 700 mourners, with police, many of them dog handlers, coming to Vancouver from across British Columbia, Washington State and even Ontario. "We lost one of our own. He wasn't just a dog. He was a loyal and dedicated member of the department and he had a police identification number to prove it," Inspector Dean Robinson said at the ceremony.  "Some day we'll see him again, and I promise on that day, we'll play ball," said an emotional Constable Rutter.  Constable Rutter has taken a position in administration with the dog squad, where he is helping with training. He hasn't been assigned a new dog.  Peter Stabler, the Crown counsel, said the judge did not hold the death of Nitro against Mr. Pete when it came to sentencing. "The judge said that as much as a concern [as] that was, he didn't take it into account on sentencing because there was no intent, by whoever the dog chased, to do anything to the dog. They were just running away . . . which is I think correct," Mr. Stabler said.  Although Nitro is dead, and the last criminal he pursued has served his time, the dog may have left a lasting legacy in the city. Shortly after his death, Vancouver council approved a $1.65-million plan to build a 370-square-metre dog squad facility.
Vancouver police dog mourned   -  Jan. 25 2006
A Vancouver police dog was killed on Monday night while trying to stop a suspect who had jumped onto a moving rail car.  Nitro, an eight-year-old German Shepherd, had been with the police department since 1999, always with the same handler, Const. Howard Rutter.   On Monday evening, they began a pursuit of a stolen car in East Vancouver – following the vehicle along Marine Drive into New Westminster.   They caught up with the stolen car near a rail line, where traffic had stopped for a train.   The two suspects ended up fleeing on foot, with Rutter and Nitro still in pursuit. One of the men saw the dog closing in on him and jumped up onto the side of a stationery box car. The dog jumped up after him and got a grip on the man's leg. The train then started to move, and Nitro lost his grip and fell to his death under its wheels .  The two suspects managed to get away. But one man was taken into custody a few hours later.  Nitro and Const. Howard Rutter take part in a training exercise.(Courtesy: Clay Stang/VPD)  26 year-old Gregg Daniel Pete of Vancouver has been charged with possession of stolen property over $5,000.   Police are still looking for the second man.  Nitro is featured in an ICBC auto theft poster campaign, which begins next month. He was also the first police dog named in the police department's "name the puppy" contest.  Police spokesperson Const. Howard Chow says the department is planning a public memorial event at a local armoury next month.  The Vancouver Police Department has 16 dogs. Nitro was the seventh to die in the line of duty since the gog squad was formed in 1957. 

Barks, yips and howls punctuate police dog funeral in Vancouver  THE ASSOCIATED PRESS ` Tuesday, February 7, 2006
VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- Hundreds of police officers stood at attention as a funeral for one of their own was punctuated by howls and yips.  A cacophony of barking arose Monday as 92 police dog teams they paraded past a shrine and urn containing the ashes of Nitro, a German shepherd that died in the line of duty two weeks earlier.  Nitro's handler, Constable Howard Rutter and his wife Carolyn, son Matthew and daughter Megan sat in the front row in Seaforth Armouries and fought back tears for much of the 70-minute service, which included three eulogies and a multimedia production on an overhead screen. "There were so many times that I would be frustrated with Nitro and get mad at him, but all it took was him coming over and licking my face and all would be well again," Rutter wrote in a full-color printed tribute to police service dog No. 9755. The funeral was preceded by a motorcade of 60 police vehicles with lights flashing. Many of the dog teams in attendance were from police agencies in neighboring Washington state, including Seattle, Everett, Yakima and Monroe, Nitro's birthplace.  Nitro, 8 1/2, a Vancouver police dog since 1999, died after lunging to grab a man sought for investigation of automobile theft, losing his grip and falling under the wheels of a train. By Sunday 185 messages of condolences had been posted on a police Web page set up for the dog. The man Nitro grabbed, Greg Daniel Pete, 26, was arrested and charged with possession of stolen property over $5,000.  In keeping with Vancouver Police tradition, Nitro's ashes will be spread on each of the four corners of the city, so he can guard Vancouver even in his afterlife.

Canine colleagues gather to honour Nitro's courage    PETTI FONG   VANCOUVER -- It began with a lone howl. 
Then down the line of cars, dogs leaned out the windows to listen and the barking began. Canine units from the United States and British Columbia proceeded through downtown Vancouver yesterday, as dogs howled in the backseat on their way to the Seaforth Armoury, to mourn the death of police dog Nitro. The police canine died in the line of duty Jan. 23. Nitro was set to retire this spring after developing arthritis in his elbows. But that didn't slow the German shepherd down as he chased two accused car thieves who jumped on a train in New Westminster. When the train began moving, eight-year-old Nitro slipped under the wheels and was instantly killed.  Vancouver's police department hadn't expected Nitro's death to hit the public so hard.  Mourners from as far away as Britain began sending hundreds of e-mails and sympathy cards to the department. Nitro's death inspired some to write poetry and make crafts, such as wooden urns for the dog's handler, Constable Howard Rutter.  Others remembered beloved pets, posting pictures of their own dogs on the message board. It was all a bit too much for one Vancouver newspaper columnist, who wrote that mourners were descending into emotional quicksand when they began comparing Nitro to a human being. In response, Sergeant Mark Tonner made what he called a bold statement: that he is convinced all dogs go to heaven. "Yes, I said it," Sgt. Tonner wrote. "Does that mean Nitro is chasing bad guys through sunny meadows, young and arthritis-free?" No, Sgt. Tonner reminded mourners, "there aren't supposed to be any bad guys in Paradise."  His voice cracking with emotion, Vancouver Police Chief Jamie Graham said Nitro inspired a special kind of grief. To those who say that Nitro's death was just that of a dog, Chief Graham said that's like saying it's just a husband or just a daughter.  "The stages of grief we feel over the loss of this great animal is not unlike the loss we would feel over the loss of a human partner," he said, as mourners nodded and wiped away tears.  The ceremony included more than 70 dogs paying tribute to Nitro, as their handlers led them to sit briefly in front of the memorial where the canine's badge, collar and urn were on display.  The piper leading the procession was almost drowned out by the barks and howls. Some of the mourners came during their lunch break wearing business suits and work uniforms. One woman carried white lilies with eight dog biscuits tied at the stem. More than 50 of the mourners purchased a $20 DVD about Nitro's life, which included images of his puppy days and a slow-motion montage of him running in a field.  Lorraine Mitchell, whose Rottweiler-shepherd mix, Moose, died three years ago, had tears in her eyes as she watched the procession pass on Burrard Street.  "I know there are some people who would think it is ridiculous to have this," she said. "But it's sad and real to many people, and it's a good thing that we can be so touched by a living being."  Nitro is being mourned not just as a pet, but as a police officer, said Stanley Coren, a University of British Columbia psychology professor who has written extensively about dogs.  Prof. Coren believes that is because Nitro represented more than an officer and a pet when he died in the line of duty.  "This is a dog whose name we happen to know because he did something we all know our dogs would do for us, protecting us for no other reason than because of their loyalty," he said. "This dog suddenly became a dog to make us remember all other dogs." submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA  & Cst. Steve Kaye

MORE

VANCOUVER - A second person has been charged in connection with the foot chase which resulted in the death of Vancouver Police dog ‘Nitro’.   Nitro was killed last week after being struck by a train while chasing two alleged car thieves. One of the two suspects, 26 year old Greg Pete was arrested a short time after the incident, but the second suspect got away.However, last night police found and arrested Pete’s younger brother, 24 year old Jeremy Pete.Vancouver Police allege Jeremy Pete was the suspect who jumped onto a moving box car, causing nitro to fall under the train to his death. Both men are facing a variety of charges. A formal ceremony in honour of Nitro is set for next week. Nitro is your friend and says: "No matter what a stranger tells you NEVER get into a car with someone you don't know."  Nitro is two years old and has been recently certified as a police dog. He is looking forward to a long career protecting you and capturing bad guys. Nitro loves to play ball and spend time at home with his family.A formal ceremony in honour of Nitro is set for next week.
Vancouver police dog mourned   -  Jan 25 2006
A Vancouver police dog was killed on Monday night while trying to stop a suspect who had jumped onto a moving rail car.  Nitro, an eight-year-old German Shepherd, had been with the police department since 1999, always with the same handler, Const. Howard Rutter.   On Monday evening, they began a pursuit of a stolen car in East Vancouver – following the vehicle along Marine Drive into New Westminster.   They caught up with the stolen car near a rail line, where traffic had stopped for a train.   The two suspects ended up fleeing on foot, with Rutter and Nitro still in pursuit. One of the men saw the dog closing in on him and jumped up onto the side of a stationery box car. The dog jumped up after him and got a grip on the man's leg. The train then started to move, and Nitro lost his grip and fell to his death under its wheels .  The two suspects managed to get away. But one man was taken into custody a few hours later.  Nitro and Const. Howard Rutter take part in a training exercise.(Courtesy: Clay Stang/VPD)  26 year-old Gregg Daniel Pete of Vancouver has been charged with possession of stolen property over $5,000.   Police are still looking for the second man.  Nitro is featured in an ICBC auto theft poster campaign, which begins next month. He was also the first police dog named in the police department's "name the puppy" contest.  Police spokesperson Const. Howard Chow says the department is planning a public memorial event at a local armoury next month.  The Vancouver Police Department has 16 dogs. Nitro was the seventh to die in the line of duty since the gog squad was formed in 1957. 
***************************
Barks, yips and howls punctuate police dog funeral in Vancouver

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS ` Tuesday, February 7, 2006
VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- Hundreds of police officers stood at attention as a funeral for one of their own was punctuated by howls and yips.  A cacophony of barking arose Monday as 92 police dog teams they paraded past a shrine and urn containing the ashes of Nitro, a German shepherd that died in the line of duty two weeks earlier.  Nitro's handler, Constable Howard Rutter and his wife Carolyn, son Matthew and daughter Megan sat in the front row in Seaforth Armouries and fought back tears for much of the 70-minute service, which included three eulogies and a multimedia production on an overhead screen. "There were so many times that I would be frustrated with Nitro and get mad at him, but all it took was him coming over and licking my face and all would be well again,"
 Rutter wrote in a full-color printed tribute to police service dog No. 9755.

The funeral was preceded by a motorcade of 60 police vehicles with lights flashing. Many of the dog teams in attendance were from police agencies in neighboring Washington state, including Seattle, Everett, Yakima and Monroe, Nitro's birthplace.  Nitro, 8 1/2, a Vancouver police dog since 1999, died after lunging to grab a man sought for investigation of automobile theft, losing his grip and falling under the wheels of a train. By Sunday 185 messages of condolences had been posted on a police Web page set up for the dog. The man Nitro grabbed, Greg Daniel Pete, 26, was arrested and charged with possession of stolen property over $5,000.  In keeping with Vancouver Police tradition, Nitro's ashes will be spread on each of the four corners of the city, so he can guard Vancouver even in his afterlife.
****************
Canine colleagues gather to honour Nitro's courage PETTI FONG   VANCOUVER -- It began with a lone howl. 
Then down the line of cars, dogs leaned out the windows to listen and the barking began. Canine units from the United States and British Columbia proceeded through downtown Vancouver yesterday, as dogs howled in the backseat on their way to the Seaforth Armoury,
to mourn the death of police dog Nitro. The police canine died in the line of duty Jan. 23. 

Nitro was set to retire this spring after developing arthritis in his elbows. But that didn't slow the German shepherd down as he chased two accused car thieves who jumped on a train in New Westminster. When the train began moving, eight-year-old Nitro slipped under the wheels and was instantly killed.  Vancouver's police department hadn't expected Nitro's death to hit the public so hard.  Mourners from as far away as Britain began sending hundreds of e-mails and sympathy cards to the department. Nitro's death inspired some to write poetry and make crafts, such as wooden urns for the dog's handler, Constable Howard Rutter.  Others remembered beloved pets, posting pictures of their own dogs on the message board. It was all a bit too much for one Vancouver newspaper columnist, who wrote that mourners were descending into emotional quicksand when they began comparing Nitro to a human being. In response, Sergeant Mark Tonner made what he called a bold statement: that he is convinced all dogs go to heaven. "Yes, I said it," Sgt. Tonner wrote. "Does that mean Nitro is chasing bad guys through sunny meadows, young and arthritis-free?" No, Sgt. Tonner reminded mourners, "there aren't supposed to be any bad guys in Paradise."  His voice cracking with emotion, Vancouver Police Chief Jamie Graham said Nitro inspired a special kind of grief. To those who say that Nitro's death was just that of a dog, Chief Graham said that's like saying it's just a husband or just a daughter.  "The stages of grief we feel over the loss of this great animal is not unlike the loss we would feel over the loss of a human partner," he said, as mourners nodded and wiped away tears.  The ceremony included more than 70 dogs paying tribute to Nitro, as their handlers led them to sit briefly in front of the memorial where the canine's badge, collar and urn were on display.  The piper leading the procession was almost drowned out by the barks and howls. Some of the mourners came during their lunch break wearing business suits and work uniforms. One woman carried white lilies with eight dog biscuits tied at the stem. More than 50 of the mourners purchased a $20 DVD about Nitro's life, which included images of his puppy days and a slow-motion montage of him running in a field.  Lorraine Mitchell, whose Rottweiler-shepherd mix, Moose, died three years ago, had tears in her eyes as she watched the procession pass on Burrard Street.  "I know there are some people who would think it is ridiculous to have this," she said. "But it's sad and real to many people, and it's a good thing that we can be so touched by a living being."  Nitro is being mourned not just as a pet, but as a police officer, said Stanley Coren, a University of British Columbia psychology professor who has written extensively about dogs.  Prof. Coren believes that is because Nitro represented more than an officer and a pet when he died in the line of duty.  "This is a dog whose name we happen to know because he did something we all know our dogs would do for us, protecting us for no other reason than because of their loyalty," he said. "This dog suddenly became a dog to make us remember all other dogs."
follow up submitted by
Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA  


In Loving Memory of
K-9 NOAH
June 4, 2006
    
Handler: Officer Marijo Zawilla
SGT. THOMAS DAVIS
Niles Police Deartment, IL
7000 W. Touhy Avenue
Niles, Illinois 60714 - (847)588-6505 

Niles' police dog, Noah, dies; served 10 years 
Flags were at half-mast Monday as the Niles Police Department mourned the loss of K-9 officer Noah. Noah, a yellow Labrador retriever, began his career with the police department more than eight years ago, when he entered his K-9 training. Noah helped the department by locating narcotics and searching for missing persons. One of his favorite activities was visiting schools and teaching students how canines locate drugs. Noah, one of the department's two K-9 officers, had been recently diagnosed with cancer. He died June 4 while off duty with his handler, Officer Marijo Zawilla. He was 10 years old. "He will be missed by this department and the many people he touched over his short life," said a statement from the Niles Police Department. Niles officers will be wearing black mourning badges for 30 days, a customary tribute to a fallen fellow officer. Memorial services are being planned for Noah. 
Police Remember A Friend
Noah wasn't just a canine unit to the Niles Police Dept. He was a fellow officer and a friend.The station's 10-year-old gold Labrador passed away last Sunday after suffering from a bleeding tumor.  "Its almost like [he's] one of us," said Sgt. Thomas Davis, press information officer and sergeant of staff services.  Noah spent most of his time as a sniffing dog, smelling out drugs in searches. "Noah has done many of those over the years," said Davis though he hasn't sniffed out any huge drug quantities. Noah was also trained in tracking lost subjects like burglars or missing children. Once Noah sniffed out a burglar hiding in the back room of a local business. Noah began with the police department eight years ago. He was assigned to Marijo Zawilla who was his handler and his roommate. He lived with her in her Elk Grove Village home. "She really loved the dog a lot," said Davis. "The dog lives with her day in and day out."  To honor Noah, Niles officers will wear black mourning bands over their badges for 30 days - which is customary when a fellow officer is lost. The flags at the police station are also flying at half staff. Davis said the station hasn't yet thought about replacing Noah. He was one of two canines working for the Village of Niles and specialized in searches.  "At this point, I don't think they want to talk about replacement right way," said Davis. At this point, Davis did not know when or where Noah's memorial service would be held. He did say a ceremony would be forthcoming. 
**************
PRESS RELEASE- 05 June 2006
IT IS WITH DEEP REGRET THAT THE VILLAGE OF NILES POLICE DEPARTMENT ANNOUNCES THE PASSING OF NOAH, ONE OF OUR TWO CANINES. NOAH PASSED AWAY SUNDAY JUNE 4TH WHILE OFF-DUTY AND WITH HIS HANDLER NILES OFFICER MARIJO ZAWILLA. NOAH WAS A 10 YEARS OLD YELLOW LABRADOR RETRIEVER AND HAD BEEN RECENTLY DIAGNOSED WITH CANCER BUT HAD CONTINUED TO WORK AND SERVE THE COMMUNITY AND POLICE DEPARTMENT OF NILES. NOAH’S CAREER BEGAN ABOUT 8 YEARS AGO WHEN HE ENTERED K-9 TRAINING. HE WAS OBTAINED BY THE NILES POLICE DEPARTMENT AND ASSIGNED TO OFFICER ZAWILLA. OVER HIS CAREER NOAH ASSISTED IN APPREHENDING NUMEROUS CRIMINALS AS HE WAS TRAINED IN TRACKING AND NARCOTICS SEARCHES. NOAH ALSO WAS USED IN TRACKING LOST SUBJECTS AND PERFORMING ARTICLE SEARCHES. ONE OF NOAH’S FAVORITE DUTIES WAS TO HELP TO INFORM OUR YOUNG STUDENTS AT VARIOUS SCHOOLS IN THE AREA BY PERFORMING HIS TALENTS LISTED ABOVE. HE WILL BE MISSED BY THIS DEPARTMENT AND THE MANY PEOPLE HE TOUCHED OVER HIS SHORT LIFE. NILES OFFICERS ARE WEARING BLACK MOURNING BANDS OVER THEIR BADGES FOR 30 DAYS WHICH IS CUSTOMARY WHEN A FELLOW OFFICER IS LOST. A MEMORIAL CEREMONY WILL BE FORTHCOMING.


In Loving Memory of
K-9 NELO
November 29, 2006

Handler: K-9 Officer Denise Knoke

Brandywine Regional Police Department 
1212 Horseshow Pike
Downington, PA  19335
610 269.4300 fax 610 873.4550

Police K-9 found dead 11/30/06    VIDEO - http://cbs3.com/video/?id=33380@kyw.dayport.com
The Brandywine Regional Police department's worst fears were confirmed on Wednesday, when the department's K-9, Nelo, was found dead in a wooded, swampy area in the township, three days after he was reported missing. "We are all very deeply saddened by the events which have transpired over the last three days," Brandywine Regional Police Chief Mark D. Kocsi said in a statement. "The support of the community and our many well-wishers is helping us deal with this tragedy. "K-9 dogs are considered police officers, so the death of any police officer, regardless of whether that officer is human or animal, tears at the heart of the bond we have for our fellow officers," Kocsi added in an e-mail on Wednesday evening. Nelo, a 16-month-old male German shepherd, had been living with his handler, K-9 Officer Denise Knoke, in West Caln. At about 10 p.m. on Sunday, Knoke took Nelo for a walk, according to Kocsi. Kocsi said one of Knoke's neighbors was having a party at the time, and fireworks were set off at the residence. The fireworks apparently sent Nelo running. Kocsi said Knoke chased Nelo before losing the dog in the darkness and a heavily wooded area. Nelo was last seen in the 900 block of Telegraph Road, in West Caln. Brandywine Regional Police, with assistance from other county agencies and organizations, searched Monday and Tuesday for Nelo. The dog was found dead by hunters in a densely wooded, swampy area on Wednesday about a mile from where he was reported missing. Kocsi said police, with assistance from the Chester County District Attorney's Office, will conduct an investigation to determine the cause of death. When the dog was first reported missing, police feared that he might be shot by a hunter, because Monday was the first day of hunting season. "Officer Knoke is extremely distressed at this time," Kocsi said. "Nelo was her partner, so we are following the same protocols as we would in any officer death situation."  Nelo had only been working with Brandywine Regional Police for three weeks before he was reported missing. The dog had recently completed about three months of training on narcotics.  Kocsi said Nelo began working with the department on Nov. 6, and he was sworn in as a member of the department on Nov. 15. The chief added that the District Attorney's office approved an $8,000 grant for Brandywine Regional Police to have a K-9 trained. Kocsi said any decisions about the department getting a new dog will be made at a later date. Before Nelo was located on Wednesday, Kocsi described the dog as very friendly and approachable. "The Brandywine Regional Police want to thank the many people and organizations that helped and offered help in their search for Nelo," Kocsi said. "Arrangements will be made for Nelo during the next couple of days, and we will pass on any information that develops." 
Police dog gets fitting, rare tribute Nelo, a Chesco
K-9 killed by a hunter last month, was memorialized by 15 canines and coworkers yesterday.
By Kathleen Brady Shea  Inquirer Staff Writer

The peak Kleenex moment occurred yesterday as a bagpiper played "Amazing Grace" and a police officer accepted the ashes of her slain K-9 partner. The memorial service for Nelo, the drug-sniffing German shepherd mistakenly shot by a hunter last month, included familiar elements: A photo display in the vestibule of the East Brandywine Baptist Church. Remembrance cards. Ardent eulogies. But the half-hour proceeding also featured an uncommon tribute: a procession of 15 K-9 officers that periodically erupted into a chorus of barking.  Among the speakers was Brandywine Regional Police Chief Mark D. Kocsi, who remembered the 16-month-old Nelo as "full of life, full of energy, and very eager to please."  Kocsi, who said his childhood included an occasional goldfish, told a crowd of about 100 that he did not understand the bond many people feel with animals, until after Nelo's body was found on Nov. 29. Although other officers, notably Denise Knoke, Nelo's handler, were visibly distraught, Kocsi said he did not immediately share the depth of their pain.  When he got home, Kocsi said a rambunctious puppy his family had recently acquired followed him around, eventually jumping into the chief's lap. "It suddenly hit me that Buddy was smelling Nelo," Kocsi said, adding that he felt "a quiet comfort" that shed light on a relationship he had missed for most of his life.  The fact that Nelo was sworn in as a police officer compounded the tragedy of his loss, Kocsi said after the service.  Knoke, who was walking Nelo near her home on Nov. 26 when a firecracker startled him and he broke free of his leash, said she was grateful for the outpouring of support.  District Attorney Joseph W. Carroll said the investigation into Nelo's death has not been completed. However, Carroll said a hunter, whose name  http://cbs3.com/video/?id=33380@kyw.dayport.comwas not released, mistook Nelo for a coyote and shot him in a wooded area of West Caln Township.  Knoke said initially she could not imagine getting another K-9 partner; however, as she grappled with Nelo's loss, she said she hoped the police commission would give her another chance.  "I was really looking forward to taking Nelo into the schools," she said. "His friendly disposition would have been great for the community."  Among those who attended the service was Atlantic City Police Department K-9 Officer Garry Stowe, who described the memorial service as "very powerful."  Stowe and fellow K-9 colleague William F. Logan Jr. said it was important to make the trip, even though they had to sandwich it between back-to-back midnight to 8 a.m. shifts. Their K-9 partners, Nitro and Deuce, did not share their handlers' sleep deprivation since they got to snooze in the car. "If we could only teach them to drive and answer the radio, we'd be all set," Logan joked.
P.S.  Bob & I attended this memorial service and I donated 200 photo memorial cards to handler.DeniseShe was still in shock... didn't respond to anyone at the service.
We attended refreshment together with other mourner after service, a SAD day.

suggestions@brandywineregional.org


In Loving Memory of 
K-9 NOAH

June 4, 2006

 
Handler: Officer Marijo Zawilla

Niles Police Deartment, Illinoisemail
7000 W Touhy Avenue
Niles, Illinois 60714
(847)588-6500

Niles' police dog, Noah, dies; served 10 years 
Flags were at half-mast Monday as the Niles Police Department mourned the loss of K-9 officer Noah. Noah, a yellow Labrador retriever, began his career with the police department more than eight years ago, when he entered his K-9 training. Noah helped the department by locating narcotics and searching for missing persons. One of his favorite activities was visiting schools and teaching students how canines locate drugs. Noah, one of the department's two K-9 officers, had been recently diagnosed with cancer. He died June 4 while off duty with his handler, Officer Marijo Zawilla. He was 10 years old. 
"He will be missed by this department and the many people he touched over his short life," said a statement from the Niles Police Department.  Niles officers will be wearing black mourning badges for 30 days, a customary tribute to a fallen fellow officer. Memorial services are being planned for Noah.
Nitro's service:Barks, yips and howls punctuate police dog funeral in Vancouver  
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- Hundreds of police officers stood at attention as a funeral for one of their own was punctuated by howls and yips.  A cacophony of barking arose Monday as 92 police dog teams paraded past a shrine and urn containing the ashes of Nitro, a German shepherd that died in the line of duty two weeks earlier. Nitro's handler, Constable Howard Rutter and his wife Carolyn, son Matthew and daughter Megan sat in the front row in Seaforth Armouries and fought back tears for much of the 70 minute service, which included three eulogies and a multimedia production on an overhead screen. "There were so many times that I would be frustrated with Nitro and get mad at him, but all it took was him coming over and licking my face and all would be well again,"
Rutter wrote in a full-color printed tribute to police service dog No. 9755.
The funeral was preceded by a motorcade of 60 police vehicles with lights flashing. Many of the dog teams in attendance were from police agencies in neighboring Washington state, including Seattle, Everett, Yakima and Monroe, Nitro's birthplace. Nitro, 8 1/2, a Vancouver police dog since 1999, died after lunging to grab a man sought for investigation of automobile theft, losing his grip and falling under the wheels of a train. By Sunday 185 messages of condolences had been posted on a police Web page set up for the dog.  The man Nitro grabbed, Greg Daniel Pete, 26, was arrested and charged with possession of stolen property over $5,000. In keeping with Vancouver police tradition, Nitro's ashes will be spread on each of the four corners of the city, so he can guard Vancouver even in his afterlife. (submitted by Annelabs@aol.com )
 
Car thief handed 10 months in case that killed Nitro  -  Loss of dog not part of sentence, judge says  6/23/06
VANCOUVER -- A petty criminal whose name is now known to just about every police officer in the city was sentenced this week to one day in jail, plus credit for time served, for stealing a Honda Civic last January.  Because the courts give double credit for time spent in custody, in effect Gregg Daniel Pete, who was in jail for five months before trial, got 10 months for stealing a car. In a city where nightclub shootings, street-racing fatalities, kidnappings and home invasions grab the headlines, Mr. Pete's crime and punishment would have probably gone unnoticed -- except for the fact that a beloved police dog died on the case. Vancouver Police Department spokesman Constable Howard Chow declined to comment on Mr. Pete's sentence yesterday, except to say that it brought some closure to a file that upset a lot of police officers.  Nitro, a nine-year-old German shepherd who received his Vancouver Police Department badge in 1999, was killed when he slipped from a moving train as he pursued Mr. Pete and another man.  Last Jan. 23, Mr. Pete, 26, was spotted in a Honda Civic that had been reported stolen a few days earlier. While an unmarked car tracked the vehicle, dog handler Constable Howard Rutter and his assistant, Nitro, were called in for backup. Then the car thieves realized they were being followed and sped off through the streets until their car was trapped at a rail crossing in New Westminster.  "When a train blocked their escape route, they jumped out of the car and ran. Police dog Nitro was released and began chasing one of the men, who jumped up on the train. Nitro latched onto him, but the train began moving and he lost his grip. He was sucked under the train and died," a Vancouver Police account of the incident said.  Mr. Pete was arrested at the scene. For days after, the shock of Nitro's death rippled through the police department.  A ceremony to mark the dog's death drew 700 mourners, with police, many of them dog handlers, coming to Vancouver from across British Columbia, Washington State and even Ontario.  "We lost one of our own. He wasn't just a dog. He was a loyal and dedicated member of the department and he had a police identification number to prove it," Inspector Dean Robinson said at the ceremony.  "Some day we'll see him again, and I promise on that day, we'll play ball," said an emotional Constable Rutter.  Constable Rutter has taken a position in administration with the dog squad, where he is helping with training. He hasn't been assigned a new dog.  Peter Stabler, the Crown counsel, said the judge did not hold the death of  Nitro against Mr. Pete when it came to sentencing. "The judge said that as much as a concern [as] that was, he didn't take it into account on sentencing because there was no intent, by whoever the dog chased, to do anything to the dog. They were just running away . . . which is I think correct," Mr. Stabler said. Although Nitro is dead, and the last criminal he pursued has served his time, the dog may have left a lasting legacy in the city. Shortly after his death, Vancouver council approved a $1.65-million plan to build a 370-square-metre dog squad facility.