Memorials to Fallen K-9s 
 2006-J
The F.A.S.T. Co. donates sets of memorial cards to all partners 
 I need your help to inform me of such losses.

Dept. addresses available for those who want to send condolences to officers. See below

In Loving Memory of
K9 JUMBER
December 2006


Handler: Paul Corridean
Mt. Rainier Police
P.G. County, MD
ph:(301) 985-6590 

My name is Paul Corridean and I was a member with Region 3 - until I relocated from Maryland to Tennessee.  My K-9 partner Jumber and I were with the Mt. Rainier Police in P.G. County, MD.  Once we relocated, we learned that Jumber was suffering from a neurological condition that was slowly paralizing him.  During December 2005 after much treatment and heartache we were forced to put him to rest.  We were blessed, however, that our family was able to be there with him when he passed.  While in the region, Jumber received his PD1 certifications as well as participated in the Iron Dog events.  Some of Jumbers notable seizures include several pounds of marijuana from BWI airport, over $70,000 in currency and CDS found in the wall of a home in Ft. Washington, Md.  K-9 Jumber was awarded the Patrol Case of the Quarter for the 2nd Quarter 2001 and a USPCA Citation for October 2001.  K-9 Jumber was also awarded a department Silver Valor award and a Bronze Valor award. K-9 Jumber was a great partner, friend, and family member who is missed greatly.
Thank you, Paul Corridean


In Loving Memory of
K9 JACK 
August 11, 2006
 

The Shreveport Fired Department
 Officers Sanders and Fire Chief Kelvin Cochran, & Marian Baker
Shreveport, Louisiana

August 11, 2006 - Fire Department’s First

Arson K-9 to be laid to Rest
The Shreveport Fired Department’s first hydrocarbon detecting (arson) K-9 will be laid to rest next week after succumbing to age related illnesses last month. “Jack” a Yellow Labrador Retriever was sworn into the department in 1992 and quickly became a dependable and reliable source of determining whether or not an petroleum based accelerant had been used at a fire scene. Anytime that the investigator (arson) felt there was probable cause that a fire may have been intentionally set, Jack was brought in to verify if an accelerant, such as gasoline,had been used. When Jack “hit” on a substance in a burnt structure, he would strike his paw repeatedly, signaling to his trainer the use of hydrocarbons. Jack is credited with investigating more than 500 fires and helping bring countless criminal arsonists to justice. Jack was retired in 2000 and spent the last six years with Marian Baker. Baker, a Shreveport city employee, worked down the hall from the Fire Investigations office in the City Hall Annex, where Jack was housed. After Jack’s handler of 6 years, Investigator Fred Sanders was tasked with preparing a new K-9 to replace him, Baker asked Sanders and Fire Chief Kelvin Cochran to become Jack’s custodian. Both agreed. Without question Jack’s contribution to the fire department was significant and contributed to the overall safety of the community and for that we owe him our thanks.
Funeral services for Jack are Monday, August 14 at 9:00 a.m. at the Fire/Police Training Academy, 6440 Greenwood Road.  The service is open to the public. 


In Loving Memory of
K9 JAZZ
November 30, 2006

Handler: Officer Gary Godlewski
Bloomfield Police Department
4530 Walnut Lake Road
P.O. Box 250188
West Bloomfield, MI 48325-0188

Bloomfield Township police dog Jazz recently marched in a parade for cancer survivors. She was asked to do so by her friends in the community, who knew Jazz had herself survived cancer. Not only that, Jazz never missed a day of work while undergoing radiation and chemotherapy. "She got a little banner with all the other survivors," said her handler and partner, K-9 Officer Gary Godlewski, who accompanied her in the walk in West Bloomfield. "She was a very unique dog, very lovable, very popular in the community."  The German shepherd, however, could not survive complications from recent surgery for arthritis. She died on Thursday, Nov. 30, at age 8.Godlewski got Jazz from Holland in 1999 when she was one. She was trained to find narcotics and do tracking. Jazz soon proved as adept at finding missing people and narcotics as she was at making new friends for the police department while giving demonstrations to students, Cub Scouts and civic groups. "She was an excellent working dog but could turn around and look a kid in the face and be just as lovable. It's very rare that you can find a dog with her working ability," said Godlewski, who holds a master trainer designation from the International Police Work Dog Association. He also serves as the canine coordinator for the Oakland Police Academy. "She did a lot of good work. We had a case on a stolen car and she did such a fast track to apprehend the suspect, I was given a departmental award. I felt guilty because she did all the work. She did get to go to the awards ceremony." After a few years of service, it was found that Jazz had cancerous tumors, and wasn't supposed to live for more than a year. But "she was a feisty little thing," he said. After treatment, she received a clean bill of health and lived an additional four years. When Jazz retired, she was replaced by Brisco, age 5, who is Godlewski's fourth dog. But Godlewski could tell Jazz missed her work. And "just this year, we decided to bring her out of retirement." She was trained to sniff for explosives and once again excelled. "Jazz ended up being a phenomenal explosive dog." There were no actual explosives cases Jazz had to work on, however, which he said was a good thing. In her lifetime, Godlewski said that Jazz worked over 300 cases. In October, Jazz attended the annual Police and Fire Open House. "A lot of people remembered her and were happy to see her."  At nights, Jazz went home with Godlewski to his Oakland County home where she was able to play with Brisco, and relax with his wife and daughter. He also has a second daughter, who is married. The department and many others miss Jazz, he said. "There has been a nice outpouring of support. It makes it a little easier."  Bloomfield Township's canine unit is the longest serving in Michigan, having had working dogs for more than 40 years. 
submitted by Jim Cortina


In Loving Memory of
K9 JARI
February 2006

Handler: Deputy Rick Rodden
Livingston County Sheriff's Department
Livingston County Jail Building
150 S. Highlander Way  -  Howell, MI 48843 - phone: 517 546.2440

K-9 Jari - (Pronounced Ya-Dee).Breed: German Shepherd. Color: Black & Tan Age; 6yrs. Born July 11th 1999  Birthplace: The Netherlands - Purchased From: Northern Michigan K-9 Inc. for $8500.00 - Deputy Richard Rodden holds the ashes of his dog, Jari, during memorial services. Jari's ashes were spread over the dog obstacle course, his favorite spot to play.  Police dog was special to community - Hundreds of Howell residents say goodbye to Jari, a member of Sheriff's Department.
Jon Zemke / Special to The Detroit News 2/28/06 - John M. Galloway / Special to The Detroit News
A large pillow sits empty on Rick Rodden's side of the bed. That's where the Livingston County Sheriff's Department deputy's police dog, Jari, dragged it to sleep when Rodden brought the German Shepherd home to his family. "That's where he slept from the third night to the last night," Rodden said.  The last night came last week when Rodden had Jari, pronounced Ya-dee, euthanized. The Sheriff's Department retired Jari, its top police dog, just a few days earlier due to a degenerative back condition.  Jari was not only well-known among members of the Sheriff's Department, he was familiar among hundreds of school children and community members as well. Jari and his handler Rodden visited hundreds of classrooms and community service groups to inform them on the department's K-9 unit.  On the job, Jari was well-respected for his work in finding explosives, tracking suspects and in some cases apprehending them.  Last Saturday morning, nearly 200 community residents as well as many police officers who worked with Jari and Rodden attended a memorial service for the dog at Police Department headquarters in Howell.  Police officers who worked with Jari and Rodden, including several other canine teams from Ann Arbor and Lansing, lined up beside Rodden and his wife as they spoke about Jari and how special the dog was to not only their family but the community. After the speeches, Rodden sprinkled Jari's ashes on the canine teams' training field while a member of Cook's Boy Scout Troop played taps.  Kevin Cook, an assistant Scoutmaster in Howell, said Jari and Rodden helped demonstrate handling a suspicious vehicle during a campout. The scouts, some of whom cried at the memorial, took to him right away.  "They really liked Jari," said Cook, who added that his wife also knew Jari from teaching second grade at St. Joseph Catholic Elementary School in Howell.  Jari won many police dog competitions across the nation.  "This is what the dog loved to do," Rodden said. "He wasn't a house dog. He loved to work. His favorite part of the day was when I put on my uniform to go to work."   Jim Bolling, a former canine officer at the Sheriff's Department, said it's normal for police officers to treat their dogs more as tools  rather than as pets. He said there is definitely a bond between the two, but the officer knows the dog is a tool first. "Because you know the dog is not going to last forever. It's going to happen a lot sooner than you think it's going to happen," Bolling said.  Rodden understands that concept, but he still treated Jari like family. Rodden uses words like dad and son when describing their relationship. He smiles when he talks about how Jari lets his son Austin sleep on his stomach or how Jari playfully dragged the 8-year-old around the house while playing tug of war.  He was like a light switch," Rodden said. "He would be on when he was needed to be on and off when he needed to be off. I have countless pictures of him being mobbed by kindergartners."  Kids loved Jari. Students flocked around him when he visited classrooms. A third-grade class in Hartland raised $1,500 to buy Jari a bulletproof vest after meeting him. Jari made it easy for police officers to make a positive first impression, especially with kids.  "You bring a dog into the mix and their attention is at a peak level," Livingston County Sheriff Bob Bezotte said. "Everybody loves dogs."  Criminals hated Jari. He tracked down numerous suspects in all sorts of weather, including finding a man hiding in waist deep water in a hole in the ice covered with reeds earlier this month. That was one of his many great finds, said Steve Armstrong, the supervisor of the Washtenaw County Sheriff's Department Canine Unit.  He called Jari an "outstanding street dog." Federal agencies always asked Jari to help at major events, such as University of Michigan Football games or the Super Bowl.  "They handpick people for those events," Armstrong said. "They don't just take anybody."  Rodden knew Jari lived to work. There was no other choice in Rodden's mind. He asked the veterinarian to euthanize him while he hugged his partner one last time.  "To do anything less than what I did would have killed him," Rodden said. "It would have killed his spirit inside. I didn't want to kill his spirit. I wanted him to go out on top. I don't have any regrets about that."


In Loving Memory of
K9 JUNIOR 

September 11, 2006 

Handlers: Sgt. John Norman
Major George Brothers
 Lexington County Sheriff Department 
521 Gibson Rd. 
Lexington, South Carolina 29072 
Phone: (803)785-8230 Fax: (803)785-1162
 

Veteran police dog put to sleep By ISHMAEL TATE 9/14/06  South Carolina 
A Lexington County Sheriff’s Department K-9 police dog that handled more than 1,000 calls and served 12 years was put to sleep Monday. Junior, a 17-year-old mixed breed redbone and bloodhound, suffered from severe hip and leg problems, said Lexington County Sheriff James R. Metts.  Junior was a member of the department’s Man-Tracking Team and successfully tracked down 68 percent of the criminal suspects and missing persons he was assigned to find, Metts said. “Junior was a very durable dog,” said Col. Mel Seboe, who supervises the team. “He ran more calls for service and served a longer tour of duty than most bloodhounds who serve on the Man-Tracking Team.” Most bloodhounds work only eight to 10 years before retiring. West Columbia Police Sgt. John Norman, who was one of Junior’s handlers when he worked for the sheriff’s department’s tracking team, cared for Junior after he retired in January 2004. Maj. George Brothers and Junior joined the team at the same time in 1992. “Junior and I learned and grew together. We found many lost children and put many criminal suspects in jail,” Brothers said. “I have truly lost a friend.” The tracking team has two K-9 police dogs, Metts said. Hammer and Annie are sibling purebred bloodhounds.
submitted by Jim Cortina


In Loving Memory of
K9 JUMBO
August 7, 2006

Handler: Officer Dan Pleckham
Yorkville Police Department
804 Game Farm Rd
Yorkville, IL 60560
Phone: (630) 553-4340 Fax: (630) 553-2061

Memorial today for Yorkville police dog    9/2/06 - Illinois
A memorial is planned for 6:30 p.m. today at Beecher Community Park for the Yorkville Police Department's first police dog. K-9 Officer Jumbo died last month at age 10 after a seven-year career with the Yorkville police. Police dogs from other communities will participate in the service, and bagpipers will play at the event during Yorkville's Hometown Days festival at the park, 908 Game Farm Road. Police and city staff are raising money for a new K-9 officer. For more information, call (630) 553-4340.  The city is mourning the passing of a Yorkville Police Department veteran. In his seven-year law enforcement career, he uncovered heroin, cocaine, ecstasy and several pounds of marijuana. He caught burglars. He tracked down a 4-year-old Plano boy who had run away from home. Police in eight counties sought his assistance. So did state troopers. If you think that kind of track record requires inhuman effort, you're right. It's the work of Yorkville's very first police dog, Jumbo, who died of natural causes Monday, a week before his 10th birthday. Sworn in by Mayor Art Prochaska in 1999, the hulking black Belgian shepherd was, in the words of his handler, Officer Dan Pleckham, "the best partner a police officer could have."  K-9 officer Jumbo — pronounced Yumbo — hailed from Belgium and responded only to orders in Flemish, making it almost impossible for criminals to give counter commands.  A Police Department scrapbook commemorates his many achievements. Once, several years ago, while assisting another county in searching for a body, Pleckham and Jumbo found themselves in the company of eight other officer-and-dog teams. "All the other dogs went left and my dog went right," Pleckham recalled.  "I thought, what the hell, let's go for a walk."   Jumbo was on the right track.  The K-9 officer has stood by Pleckham's side not only in on-the-job battles. After Pleckham was diagnosed with kidney disease in 2002, Jumbo — trained to respond to only one handler  — was forced to join him on sick leave.   While Pleckham waited to receive, and then later to recover from, two kidney transplants, the two spent slow days watching the TV show COPS, with Jumbo stretched out on the Pleckhams' floor. Sometimes Pleckham turned on his police radio, and together the duo listened to the action they had to sit out. Jumbo's death "was actually a complete shock," Pleckham said.  Even the vets said they couldn't have even known. He just knew it was his time."  Jumbo's death means no one will sleep on the floor outside Pleckham's son's room. It means that when Pleckham puts on his uniform for work, no furry partner will leap to attention. Pleckham won't hear barking when he turns on his sirens. Jumbo won't poke his nose into the front seat of the squad car to nuzzle officers. He won't wander through the police station begging the secretaries for belly rubs. "That dog had a sense of humor," recalled Lt. Donald Schwartzkopf. "We lost a good friend in him."  Since swearing in Jumbo seven years ago, the city has acquired a second police dog, Sammy. Officials would like to maintain two K-9 officers, and Alderman Rose Spears has announced plans to solicit donations for a new one. "We'd like it to be at no cost to the taxpayers if at all possible," said Police Chief Harold Martin. Private donors paid for nearly half of Jumbo's $14,000 price tag. Buying another dog would cost between $10,000 and $12,000, Martin said, because the department already owns the necessary equipment. A new K-9 officer would have big paw-prints to fill. When asked about fund-raising, Spears clarifies that she is not trying to "replace" Jumbo — only to "retain another one." "The dog can never be replaced," she said.
submitted by Jim Cortina


In Loving Memory of
K9 JIMMY 
September 10, 2006

Handler: Officer David P. Hatheway
Vernon Police Department
725 Hartford Turnpike
Vernon, Connecticut 06066
(860)872-9126

It is with a heavy heart that I announce the passing of my K9 partner, Jimmy. He originally from Hungary, was a three year old German Shepherd and served as a narcotic and patrol (tracking, criminal apprehension) K9 with the Vernon Police Department. During Jimmy’s year long career, he performed numerous narcotic searches which resulted in arrests of suspects for possession of marijuana, cocaine, and heroin. Due to his narcotic searching ability, Jimmy was used in surrounding towns, as well as with the CT State Police, with the same success seen in Vernon. Jimmy also performed numerous home and building searches for suspects, searches for evidence, tracks for suspects, and performed K9 demonstrations for the public, including the 2005 Citizens Police Academy. Surrounded by family at his home, Jimmy succumbed to heart failure on September 10, 2006. Jimmy will be sorely missed by my wife, me, and his best friend and companion, Lexi (our 3 year old female Shepherd). 
**************
Vernon police dog dies  - By: Jason Rowe, Journal Inquirer - 09/18/2006 - Connecticut
Police are dealing with the death of one of the department's two police dogs. Jimmy, a 3-year-old German Shepherd, died on Sept. 10 while off-duty after succumbing to heart disease, Lt. Mel Hardy said in a press release. The dog had been ill for several weeks before his death.  Jimmy had been partnered with Officer David Hatheway since October 2005. During that time, he was certified in narcotics detection and patrol procedures by the North American Police Work Dog Association and the Connecticut Police Work Dog Association, Hardy said. Hatheway and Jimmy were involved in a number of arrests and deployments between November 2005 and the dog's death. Among there accomplishments are the arrests of numerous suspects for possession of marijuana, cocaine, and heroin. In all, Jimmy was responsible for helping police discover 16 narcotics violations, Hardy said. Jimmy also played a role in four building searches for burglary suspects, 10 track searches for various crimes, one article search for items taken or used during a bank robbery, and one preventative operation at a large fight. Jimmy had also been deployed five times to other towns to assist with narcotics violations or to track suspects from a stolen car, police said. Jimmy also appeared in numerous demonstrations, including one at the recently completed Citizens Police Academy. With Jimmy's death, the department's police dog unit will have only one dog, Ivan, who is partnered with Officer James Grady, Capt. James Kenny said today. In the meantime, the department will work to find a new dog to replace Jimmy. Training for the new dog could begin as early as February,Kenny said.
 
submitted by Jim Cortina


In Loving Memory of
K9 JESSY
November 26, 2006


Handler:  Jessy Schmidt
Jefferson County Police Department 
Louisville, KY 40202

Thanksgiving morning at 9:30 Officer Julie Schmidt said her final good-byes to her long time partner, K-9 Jessy who had been battling cancer. Wednesday night Julie knew things were not going well for her friend. Jessy's back leg had again swollen, she was retaining fluid, and was in pain. In her heart, Julie knew the cancer was back. Making that trip to the vet, she made that difficult decision, giving Jessy her final selfless gift. Julie whispered in Jessy's ear, reminiscing over all the bad guys they caught and drugs they found.... about what a great police dog and true friend she was. Jessy wagged her tail one last time as she listened to Julie's voice, then she crossed over the Rainbow Bridge. Jessy passed with peace and dignity, free at last from her pain. I received the call while on my way to my Dad's for Thanksgiving. My first thought was "What a terrible day to loose such a wonderful dog! How could any of us bear it?"  But then it dawned on me, what better day to say good-bye? As I searched my heart to find what I could be thankful for on this sad day, I could almost feel that secret nudge from a maligns nose, our secret from July, that there were treats in my pockets for Jessy. (Really, Julie knew what we were up to and we would both suffer from that look, the roll of the eyes, and the Julie pretending nothing was going on.  But that angelic nudge by my pocket prompted me to reflect on many fond memories of Jessy. Along with my tears, I found my smile and knew that I am thankful this day, that a scrappy police dog with one flop ear that I called her boink ear came into my life seven years ago as well as the lives of my daughter and the 4-H Dog Club kids of KY. What a fabulous life this little dog had and what a positive impact she had on so many people. Julie was not Jessy's first handler. Another officer had her before. But he was involved in several wrecks while on the job with Jessy. Jessy suffered severe injuries and after healing was not keen on working for him. She was returned to the K-9 Kennels she was purchased from. There Julie found her. The connection was instant. The little Maligns that hated riding in cars would jump in for Julie, ready for duty. They had a wonderful career together. Jessy captured and located numerous bad guys. She had countless drug finds. One summer when an elderly woman wandered away and became lost, Jessy was called in to help search, almost seven days after her disappearance. On that hot July 4th, Jessy would not give in until she succeeded, bringing much needed closure to the woman's grateful family. Julie and Jessy competed on several occasions in the Police K-9 Olympics in Muncie, IN. Their photo made the AP press as Julie finished the final part of the obstacle coarse which required her to carry Jessy over the finish lie. This was quote a feat. Jessy had been spayed weeks before and Julie had injured her back while lifting Jessy onto the vet's table to have her staples removed. I had the pleasure of going to their last K-9 Olympics. I promised Julie I would get some good photos of Jessy. I was allowed on the obstacle course, high on a hill the two would soon be charging up. As Jessy topped the steep hill with Julie huffing and puffing behind her, her eyes locked on mine. With a sloppy maligns grin I saw a twinkle in her eyes. I held my breath, praying she would not A - see me as a target, which I really wasn't too concerned over, or B - come give me one of her many kisses... my biggest concern. But on she charged past me and down the hill to tackle that "bad guy in the bite suit!" He really was just asking for it after all. I realized her look was more along the lines of "get a load of this and make sure you get my good side!" Jessy was long used to me and my camera. We met when my daughter started a project to buy bullet proof vests for police dogs. When Julie learned about Stephanie's 4-H project, she contacted us, ready to help, knowing we would need a police dog to prove we were legit. Thus; began our long collaboration with Stephanie's Heroes On Paw Project as well as our friendship. Over these past seven years, I have lost track of the many early morning trips to the various TV stations to talk about the vest program, fund raiser, etc. We didn't miss a single one! With the help and support of Julie, K-9 Jessy, and the kids of the 4-H Dog Clubs, Stephanie and her project won many awards and gained National recognition. Jessy was there for every award to share it with Stephanie. One of my fondest memories was at the Bell Awards. I have a photo of Julie feeding cheese cake off her fork to Jessy!
Jessy earned her own share of awards for her work including the Pet Groups United Police Dog Award of Excellence. She became a very popular dog, featured on the cover of "Today's Woman Magazine" appearing in several issues of WOW Girlz magazine, modeling the latest in police wear in a supply catalog, the list goes on.
Jessy always attended the numerous Heroes On Paws Fund Raisers put on by our 4_H Dog Club. She was a perfect ambassador for the police department. I loved watching small kids walk up to her. With a grin she would accept their pats and hugs. I never tired of the awe on their little faces as they touched a "real live police dog." Always at the K-9 booth at the KY March Cluster, she handled herself with dignity and grace, bringing the support of the LKC to the K-9 Unit. One of my fondest memories was one of our 4-H fund raisers early on. Stephanie's 4-H dog had passed way in Stephanie's arms the night before from AIHA. Not wanting to let down the police dogs, Stephanie insisted on attending the event. But Jessy knew something was wrong with Stephanie. That day she ignored Julie, sticking to Stephanie like glue, resting her head in her lap any time she sat down. Jessy helped Stephanie get through ne of the hardest days of her young life. For that I will always be grateful. Social and friendly Jessy was, but on the many photo shoots I did with her, i saw the business end of her as well. This was one dog any person in their right mind did not want to tangle with! She knew the difference between social events and work. I never tired of photographing her in action, then having her prance over to me for a hug and secret treat. I will always remain in awe of her. My memories keep pouring in at random like a damn that has been breached. Each one brings tears along with smiles. My heart aches along with Julie's. We have been sending email memories back and forth. With Jessy's phantom nudge, I realize that her passing leaves us with much to be thankful for. She brought my young daughter into adulthood helping her grow into a confidant, strong young woman who loves her dogs and enjoys working with them. She has done the same for many of our 4-H youth. she has inspired us. As "poster dog" for Stephanie's Heroes On Paws, she has helped raise funds to assist countless fellow police K9s. And she has been a shining K-9 ambassador. A successful career Police dog. She was our "bikini dog" loving to relax by Julie's' pool. She was our "Supah Stah" famous K-9!  She was our original Hero ON Paws. For all of us who's lives she touched, we have much to be thankful for in that scrappy smiling police dog with the one boink ear.  God speed to you, K-9 Jessy. I know you will be there to greet us all when our time
comes to join you on the other side of the Rainbow Bridge. 
submitted by Julie and written by Kathy Garcia


In Loving Memory of
K9 JUNIOR
September 11, 2006 

 

  Lexington County Sheriff Department 
West Columbia Police Sgt. John Norman
Sheriff James R. Metts - Col. Mel Seboe
521 Gibson Rd

Lexington, South Carolina 29072
Phone: (803)785-8230 Fax: (803)785-116

Veteran police dog put to sleep By ISHMAEL TATE 9/14/06  South Carolina
A Lexington County Sheriff’s Department K-9 police dog that handled more than 1,000 calls and served 12 years was put to sleep Monday. Junior, a 17-year-old mixed breed redbone and bloodhound, suffered from severe hip and leg problems, said Lexington County Sheriff James R. Metts.  Junior was a member of the department’s Man-Tracking Team and successfully tracked down 68 percent of the criminal suspects and missing persons he was assigned to find, Metts said. “Junior was a very durable dog,” said Col. Mel Seboe, who supervises the team. “He ran more calls for service and served a longer tour of duty than most bloodhounds who serve on the Man-Tracking Team.” Most bloodhounds work only eight to 10 years before retiring.

West Columbia Police Sgt. John Norman, who was one of Junior’s handlers when he worked for the sheriff’s department’s tracking team, cared for Junior after he retired in January 2004. Maj. George Brothers and Junior joined the team at the same time in 1992. “Junior and I learned and grew together. We found many lost children and put many criminal suspects in jail,” Brothers said. “I have truly lost a friend.” The tracking team has two K-9 police dogs, Metts said. Hammer and Annie are sibling purebred bloodhounds.


In loving Memory of
K9 JANUS
May 6, 2006


Handler: Richard S. Churchill  (ret. )
Quincy Police Department

1 Sea Street
Quincy, MA 02169
Telephone: (617) 479-1212

It saddens me to inform you that last Saturday I had to put to sleep my partner of nearly 8 years. K-9 Janus retired from the Quincy Police Department, Quincy, MA. We retired together in 2004. Janus was my second partner, Oldo retired in 1999. He passed in 2002. It does not get any easier and Janus ends my K-9 involvement than spans well over 12 years. passed away today after a sudden illness. He spent his last days in an emergency hospital in Norwalk and died while being prepped for an exploratory surgery.  My dedicated partner and friend worked the streets of New Britain for 9 years and made quite a name for himself during his tour of duty. I miss him greatly.  
Best Regards
- Richard S. Churchill K-9 Handler (ret) Quincy Police Department
****************
K-9 Janus was imported for Germany in 1999. After completing a 16 week academy at the Plymouth County Sheriff's Office K-9 Academy, Officer Churchill and K-9 Janus were assigned to the Special Operations Unit of the Quincy Police Department, Quincy, MA. Officer Churchill and K-9 Janus also were assigned to the regional SWAT team of Norfolk County. K-9 Janus participated in numerous searches and finds involving both the Quincy Police and NORSTAR  SWAT team.  Officer Churchill and K-9 Janus retired together in February 2004.
K-9 Janus succumbed to cancer on May 6, 2006. He will be terribly missed by the entire Churchill Family, Chris, Rob, Sara and Richard Jr.
submitted by submitted by Joe Petro & Jim Cortina


In Loving Memory of
K9 JON JON
February 3, 2006


Handler: Deputy Rick Koontz
Douglas County Sheriff's Department
P.O. Box 218 = 1625 8th Street
Minden, NV 89423 - PH:(775)782-9075

Memorial Service: 
A memorial service is set for 1 p.m. Feb. 24 at the Douglas County Fairgrounds for Jon-Jon, a Douglas County Sheriff's Office patrol dog killed Feb.3 in a vehicle fire. The public is invited to attend the event which is expected to attract canine handlers and their dogs from Nevada and other western states. Participants are to meet at the sheriff's office at noon for a motorcade down Highway 395 to the fairgrounds off Pinenut Road.

1 of 5   Lisa J. Tolda / Reno Gazette-Journal
A police dog rests Friday Feb. 24, 2006 by his trainer during a ceremony at the Douglas County Fairgrounds to honor Jon-Jon, a K9 deputy with the Douglas County Sheriff's Office that died in the line of duty. The 5-year-old black Labrador retriever died Feb. 3 when his handler's patrol car caught fire as Deputy Rick Koontz was investigating an alarm going off in a building.

  2 of 5   Lisa J. Tolda / Reno Gazette-Journal
Douglas County Sheriff's Deputy Rick Koontz listens Friday Feb. 24, 2006 during a memorial service for his partner, K9 deputy Jon-Jon, a 5-year-old black Labrador retriever that died in the line of duty.
 
 of 5   Lisa J. Tolda / Reno Gazette-Journal
At least 15 representatives from state and regional law enforcement offices take part Friday Feb. 24, 2006 in the motorcade to honor Jon-Jon during the police dog's funeral at the Douglas County Fairgrounds.
 
  4 of 5   Lisa J. Tolda / Reno Gazette-Journal
This photo of Douglas County Sheriff's Deputy Rick Koontz and his narcotics detection dog Jon-Jon greeted people Friday Feb. 24, 2006 during the dog's memorial service.
5 of 5   Lisa J. Tolda / Reno Gazette-Journal
At least 15 representatives from state and regional law enforcement offices take part Friday Feb. 24, 2006 in the motorcade and memorial service to honor Jon-Jon during the police dog's funeral at the Douglas County Fairgrounds.
I am the wife of Sgt. Joe Duffy in charge of a K-9 unit with the Douglas County Sheriff's Department in Douglas County, Nevada.  Nevada suffered it's first loss of a K-9 drug dog this past week.  Jon Jon was a black Labrador who perished in the line of duty.  Jon Jon's handler was searching a commercial building and when he returned to his patrol car it was fully engulfed  in flames.  Jon Jon's handler Rick Koontz attempted to rescue his partner from the vehicle, but was unable to save Jon Jon before he perished.  The fire is being investigated, but it looks to have been started in the engine compartment.
MEMORIAL SERVICE 
The memorial service will be held at 1300 on Feb. 24, 2006.  
Community remembers canine deputy
Tim Anderson RENO GAZETTE-JOURNAL 2/25/06 NV
 
Jon-Jon, Douglas County's drug-detection dog that died three weeks ago in the line of duty, was remembered Friday for his loyalty and dedication. In a memorial service with full law-enforcement honors, Douglas County Sheriff Ron Pierini said the beloved 5-year-old black Labrador made a major contribution to public safety.  "He never received a paycheck, never asked for benefits, never had any special privileges," Pierini said. But he added that Jon-Jon also never wavered in helping the community.  Jon-Jon died Feb. 3 when the patrol car he was in caught fire. A crowd estimated by sheriff's officials at 600, along with about 50 dogs, attended the service at the Douglas County Fairgrounds Pavilion south of Gardnerville on Friday.  Residents lined sidewalks along U.S. 395 as a motorcade of law enforcement vehicles went from the sheriff's office in Minden and through Gardnerville to the fairgrounds.  Officials said representatives of at least 15 state and regional law enforcement agencies, including the Las Vegas and San Francisco police departments, were among those paying their respects at the emotional service.
 
Jon-Jon: a loved Lab
Jon-Jon is the first Northern Nevada canine deputy to lose his life in the line of duty and the first to be honored with a funeral. Two other law enforcement dogs affiliated with the Las Vegas Metro Police Department have been killed while on duty.  Pierini said Jon-Jon, under the handling of Deputy Rick Koontz, was involved in about 400 narcotics cases over the past three years.  Koontz also took his canine partner to schools throughout the area where students learned about department programs and the value of having dogs on patrol or sniffing for drugs.  Department officials emphasized Jon-Jon was part of the Koontz family.  Officials said Koontz and another deputy had left the car to investigate a building burglar alarm and came back to see the patrol car engulfed in flames. The fire was caused by an electrical shortage, Pierini said. After the ceremony, Koontz said he was impressed by the turnout and the support from the community.  "Coming here (on the motorcade), people were holding up signs for Jon-Jon. When I saw that, it really got to me," Koontz said.


Community outpouring

Bill Szkrybalo of Minden was among those waiting along U.S. 395 at Waterloo Lane for the procession of law enforcement vehicles.  "These dogs protect the officers and are very faithful. They're willing to give their lives if necessary," Szkrybalo said.  During the service, Douglas County Sheriff's Chaplain Pete Nelson emphasized the importance of the canine program.  "These animals are amazing partners. They give unconditional and unwavering love," Nelson said. Gardnerville resident Donna Leveck said she wanted to be at the ceremony to support law enforcement and the canine program.  "But I wasn't able to get through this with dry eyes," Leveck said.  San Francisco Police Sgt. Darryl Tsujimoto, who brought his canine partner Barak, said he was impressed by the community's response.  "It's refreshing to see so many people here who are really involved," Tsujimoto said.  In answer to some in the area who don't believe a dog warrants such attention, Pierini said the community's outpouring of support shows otherwise.  "This was absolutely the right thing to do. These animals track down suspects and protect officers and the public," Pierini said. 


Donations:
Donations to the Douglas County Sheriff's Office patrol and drug detection dog program may be made to the DCSO Canine Fund, c/0 Douglas County Sheriff's Office, PO Box 218, Minden, 89423 or dropped off at the sheriff's office in the Judicial and Law Enforcement Center, 1625 Eighth St., Minden.
UPDATE

Bad wiring cause fire that killed K-9 - 4/12/06 NV
An investigation into the cause of a patrol car fire that took the life of a Douglas County Sheriff's Office K-9 officer is set to be complete by the end of the month.  "Basically, the investigation is 90 percent complete," said Capt. Terry Taylor, East Fork Fire and Paramedic Districts inspector/investigator. "I'm tracking down some leads and getting some more information, but we should have everything to private counsel by the end of this month."  Taylor and sheriff's investigator Aaron Crawford are looking into the cause of the Feb. 3 fire that engulfed a patrol car while deputies were investigating an early morning alarm.  Jon-Jon, a sheriff's office drug-detecting canine officer, was in the vehicle and died of smoke inhalation.  His partner, Deputy Rick Koontz, and Deputy Dean Kumagai were inside the building when the cruiser caught fire and was engulfed in flames within minutes.  Taylor said the investigation had confirmed that the fire was caused by defective wiring.  The patrol car was a 2004 Crown Victoria manufactured by Ford Motor Co. "The real question has become was there a defect at the time of manufacture that caused the fire?" Taylor said. "That defect would be Ford's or a company contracted by Ford to do work on the Crown Victoria before it was delivered to the sheriff's office." Taylor said Ford has an opportunity to send their own experts to examine the evidence.  He said Ford has contracts with companies to add electrical wiring for police lights and sirens and other specifications. "We have ascertained where we thought the fire started was the electrical wiring installed by Ford or its subcontractor, not by Douglas County," Taylor said. He said the county's vehicle maintenance team determined the remaining Crown Victorias in the sheriff's office fleet were safe.  Taylor said the county would probably file a claim for the expense of the car, and the cost of replacing Jon-Jon and the training estimated in excess of $50,000.  "It's a straight dollar amount," Taylor said. "If a person had died, it would be different, but animals don't fall into that category." Taylor said private counsel was retained by the county because of the relationship between the sheriff's office and the district attorney's office.  "The county wanted to get someone involved who would take an independent view and had experience litigating with products," Taylor said.  Jon-Jon, a black Labrador retriever had been with the sheriff's office for four years, trained to detect narcotics and partnered with Koontz.  Following his death, there was an outpouring of support from the community and other law enforcement agencies culminating in a Feb. 24 memorial service attended by more than 600 people and 50 K-9 officers.  The sheriff's department is in the process of selecting two new K-9 officers, Sheriff Ron Pierini said Monday.  He said Jon-Jon's replacement would be assigned to Deputy Scott Battcher.  "There was a lot of interest among the deputies," Pierini said. "We like to spread the responsibility around. Training and working with a K-9 officer takes a lot of work, dedication and time."  The second dog would replace one of the department's canines ready for retirement.  "They work hard and get tired and worn out," Pierini said. The retired dogs are given to their deputy handlers.  The department's canine program is funded through private donations. In the wake of Jon-Jon's death, Pierini said the fund is at $25,000. 
YOU CAN HELP

Donations to the Douglas County Sheriff's Office patrol and drug detection dog program may be made to the DCSO Canine Fund, c/o Douglas County Sheriff's Office, PO Box 218, Minden, 89423, or dropped off at the sheriff's office in the Judicial and Law Enforcement Center,
 1625 Eighth St.,
 Minden.

submitted by Jim Cortina,  Dir. CPWDA

In Loving Memory of 
K9 JERRY
January  2006


Handler: Officer Bernard Wagg
Lancaster County Prison

625 E. King Staph: 717 299.7800
Lancaster, PA  17602

Bernard Wagg joined the Lancaster County Prison on April 12th 1993. His partner Jerry was an import from Germany. He arrived at the prison  in 2001 at the age of 2, he weighed 80 pounds.  Jerry was the only one who could understand Bernie as an Englishman trying to speak German  to him, a purebread German Sheppard.  Bernie said "I think he cut me  a lot of breaks, it was as if he could feel what I wanted him to do.  Jerry always made me look good every year when we had to do certification, it was as if he knew that all eyes were on us and he had to do good to make me look good. Know you have made me have tears in my eyes so I have to stop now." Jerry went to the animal kingdom in January of 2006, he had a large tumor in his stomach. submitted by: 
Austin Miller/Patrolman Columbia Borough Police

In Loving Memory of
K9 JARI
February 2006

Handler:  Deputy Rick Rodden
Livingston County Sheriff's Department
Livingston County Jail Building
150 S. Highlander Way  -  Howell, MI 48843

phone: 517 546.2440

K-9 Jari - (Pronounced Ya-Dee). Breed: German Shepherd. Color: Black & Tan- Age; 6yrs. Born July 11th 1999  Birthplace: The Netherlands. Purchased From: Northern Michigan K-9 Inc. for $8500.00 

Deputy Richard Rodden holds the ashes of his dog, Jari, during memorial services.  Jari's ashes were spread over the dog obstacle course, his favorite spot to play.
  


Police dog was special to community - Hundreds of Howell residents say goodbye to Jari, a member of Sheriff's Department.
Jon Zemke / Special to The Detroit News 2/28/06 - John M. Galloway / Special to The Detroit News

HOWELL -- A large pillow sits empty on Rick Rodden's side of the bed.
That's where the Livingston County Sheriff's Department deputy's police dog, Jari, dragged it to sleep when Rodden brought the German Shepherd home to his family. "That's where he slept from the third night to the last night," Rodden said.  The last night came last week when Rodden had Jari, pronounced Ya-dee, euthanized. The Sheriff's Department retired Jari, its top police dog, just a few days earlier due to a degenerative back condition.  Jari was not only well-known among members of the Sheriff's Department, he was familiar among hundreds of school children and community members as well. Jari and his handler Rodden visited hundreds of classrooms and community service groups to inform them on the department's K-9 unit.  On the job, Jari was well-respected for his work in finding explosives, tracking suspects and in some cases apprehending them.  Last Saturday morning, nearly 200 community residents as well as many police officers who worked with Jari and Rodden attended a memorial service for the dog at Police Department headquarters in Howell.  Police officers who worked with Jari and Rodden, including several other canine teams from Ann Arbor and Lansing, lined up beside Rodden and his wife as they spoke about Jari and how special the dog was to not only their family but the community. After the speeches, Rodden sprinkled Jari's ashes on the canine teams' training field while a member of Cook's Boy Scout Troop played taps.  Kevin Cook, an assistant Scoutmaster in Howell, said Jari and Rodden helped demonstrate handling a suspicious vehicle during a campout. The scouts, some of whom cried at the memorial, took to him right away.  "They really liked Jari," said Cook, who added that his wife also knew Jari from teaching second grade at St. Joseph Catholic Elementary School in Howell.  Jari won many police dog competitions across the nation.  "This is what the dog loved to do," Rodden said. "He wasn't a house dog. He loved to work. His favorite part of the day was when I put on my uniform to go to work."   Jim Bolling, a former canine officer at the Sheriff's Department, said it's normal for police officers to treat their dogs more as tools rather than as pets. He said there is definitely a bond between the two, but the officer knows the dog is a tool first.  "Because you know the dog is not going to last forever. It's going to happen a lot sooner than you think it's going to happen," Bolling said.  Rodden understands that concept, but he still treated Jari like family. Rodden uses words like dad and son when describing their relationship. He smiles when he talks about how Jari lets his son Austin sleep on his stomach or how Jari playfully dragged the 8-year-old around the house while playing tug of war.  He was like a light switch," Rodden said. "He would be on when he was needed to be on and off when he needed to be off. I have countless pictures of him being mobbed by kindergartners."  Kids loved Jari. Students flocked around him when he visited classrooms. A third-grade class in Hartland raised $1,500 to buy Jari a bulletproof vest after meeting him. Jari made it easy for police officers to make a positive first impression, especially with kids.  "You bring a dog into the mix and their attention is at a peak level," Livingston County Sheriff Bob Bezotte said. "Everybody loves dogs."  Criminals hated Jari. He tracked down numerous suspects in all sorts of weather, including finding a man hiding in waist deep water in a hole in the ice covered with reeds earlier this month. That was one of his many great finds, said Steve Armstrong, the supervisor of the Washtenaw County Sheriff's Department Canine Unit.  He called Jari an "outstanding street dog." Federal agencies always asked Jari to help at major events, such as University of Michigan Football games or the Super Bowl.  "They handpick people for those events," Armstrong said. "They don't just take anybody."  Rodden knew Jari lived to work. There was no other choice in Rodden's mind. He asked the veterinarian to euthanize him while he hugged his partner one last time.  "To do anything less than what I did would have killed him," Rodden said. "It would have killed his spirit inside. I didn't want to kill his spirit. I wanted him to go out on top. I don't have any regrets about that."

In Loving Memory of
K9 JATOS
February 2006


Handler: Inspector Steve Leslie
East London, CT   SAR
Search and rescue dog Jatos put down after life of service
By DENVER DONIAN  Crime Reporter   2/28/06


ONE of East London's best-known police K9 search and rescue dogs Jatos was put down yesterday to alleviate the suffering of old age. "It got to the point where he could not walk anymore and was in a lot of pain," his former handler Inspector Steve Leslie said.  Leslie and Jatos joined forces in 2001 and together conducted more than 250 searches over that period. Jatos, who recently turned 12 years old , was "pensioned off" last year and spent his last days on Leslie's farm in Lilyfontein.  "After his retirement to my farm his health deteriorated rapidly. One can assume that the vigorous lifestyle led by Jatos as a search and rescue dog may have played a role in this," Leslie said. He said he had built up a strong bond with Jatos and "we worked as partners."  He was instrumental in recovering 94 bodies, many drowning victims, and pointed out several missing people who were close to death in bushy areas. At least three of those people owe their lives to Jatos."  Jatos also delighted numerous schoolchildren with displays of search and rescue tactics. Leslie claims to have had a difficult time getting Jatos to realise he had to stay at home after his retirement.  "He was ready at the crack of dawn for work every day ... that is until recently when his health started failing."  Leslie, who has spent 29 years as a dog handler, added: "Having to put Jatos down was a tear-jerking experience. It was one of those decisions you do not want to make ... but it was based on humane grounds and the right thing to do."


In Loving Memory of
K9 JESSE
March 8, 2006

Handler: Jonni Joyce
RDU Airport NC 27623

Jesse was the first certified explosive detection canine with RDU International Airport Police. An active member of the International Police Work Dog Association, she attended both state and national competitions. During her career, she performed explosive sweeps for many different dignitaries including the King and Queen of Qatar, the Prime Minister of Canada, The President and Vice-President of the United States, several former Presidents of the US, as well as other heads of state, cabinet members, and VIPs. She was called upon regularly to assist the US Secret Service. Daily, she would protect the traveling public at RDU. She died of complications from a massive seizure.
K9 Mighty Mony   “Jesse
After dog understood…then GOD turned to man and said, "Behold, this is your partner. You shall worship him as he worships you. It is your duty to be kind to this gentle beast and know that in his mute way, he loves you. Your purpose is to care for him, through youth and age, until he can serve no more. Understand that your final act of love will take courage. Spare your partner any pain. Save his dignity. Know that he will never lie to you, he will always understand you and that his love will be blind.   You are commanded to use him in service to mankind. I have placed him here as a guardian angel for you, to watch over you and care for you. He is from heaven, therefore divine. Let his character speak to your heart and be the example for you to follow. He shall fulfill your inequities. He shall be everything humanity strives to be: Honest, Loyal, Kind in Heart, and Strong in Spirit.   Therefore, you shall call him PARTNER and  best friend.” 
 
submitted by Jonni


Web mistress Louise Krause
birth of site June 1999
Copyright 1999-2008 FAST Co