Memorials to Fallen K-9s
 2003-M
The F.A.S.T. Co. donates sets of memorial cards to all partners 
 I need your help to inform me of such losses.

Dept. addresses available for those who want to send condolences to officers. See below

In Loving Memory of
K-9 MIKE
September 2003

 
Handler:  Officer Joe Maltese
Rialto Police Department
128 N. Willow Ave.
Rialto, CA 92376

Dogs may be man's best friend, and one could make the case that police dogs are an officer's best friend.  In Rialto, a group of volunteers has made it their mission to be the officers' best friend -- human and canine alike.  Friends of Rialto Police K-9s, a nonprofit organization formed in 1986, buys dogs for the department and pays for their training and equipment. It's the sort of community support that Rialto Police Chief Mark Kling says is rare in law enforcement circles.

Community Support
Few police departments can boast that a charitable group covers a crucial part of their budget, he said. In Rialto's case, that would be Casper, Robbie, Gilley and Smoky, the Police Department's furry four-legged peacekeepers. Friends of Rialto Police K-9s purchased all four, with Smoky the newest recruit. 

It was a bittersweet turn that brought Smoky to the Rialto Police Department. He replaces Mike, a brown Belgian malinois that joined the force in June 2003.  But last December, a veterinarian discovered that Mike had cancer. The dog's handler, Rialto police Officer Joe Maltese, took him out of service so he could spend his remaining days taking life easy.

Mike died three months later.
Friends of Rialto Police K-9s wasted no time finding a new partner for Maltese, and in June he and Smoky began six weeks of training. He became Rialto's newest patrol dog in July.  Maltese said he sometimes slips up and calls him Mike, the memory of his first canine partner still fresh.

Sad Farewell
In December, Maltese and Mike, who was trained in narcotics detection, were serving a search warrant when the dog found a large amount of methamphetamine and cash in a closet, Maltese said.  "He ran off just fine, but he came back limping to me," the officer recalled. "A day later, he was still limping."  The doctor took X-rays, and the diagnosis came on Christmas Eve. Mike had osteosarcoma, or bone cancer, in his right hind leg. "That was his last arrest," Maltese recalled. "For several weeks he rode with me, but I didn't deploy him."  The veterinarian prescribed pain medicine for Mike and warned Maltese that the osteosarcoma would make the dog's bones brittle."On March 31, we put him down because he broke his leg the night before," Maltese said. "It was probably the hardest day of my life."

Dog's Happy Place
Friends of Rialto Police K-9s covered the veterinary costs, including euthanizing Mike.  "I asked (the doctors) if they could put him to sleep in the back seat of my patrol car," Maltese said. "I thought it was best to put him down where he was happiest."  Maltese took the body of his 75-pound partner, who turned 8 a month earlier, to Gateway Pet Cemetery in San Bernardino. The Friends group picked up the tab for Mike's cremation and gave the ashes to Maltese.  "They're at my house, on a shelf in my office," he said. It's the final remnant of the bond the officer and his dog shared, on duty and at home, for almost five years.

Drilling for Fun
It was a loss that muted an otherwise joyful season in Maltese's family -- the birth of his second child, a son, occurred the month before.  Mike loved police work, especially the search drills to warehouses and residential neighborhoods that Maltese devised each week. He recalled the time a Rialto police officer lost his badge during a foot chase through a vacant field on Foothill Boulevard.
Police combed the area but couldn't find it. Mike took up the search and quickly located the badge, Maltese said.  During his first week on the job, Mike assisted in a robbery investigation at a convenience store parking lot on Riverside and Merrill avenues. The fleeing robber tossed his gun and the victim's car keys, but Mike found them in tall bushes.  "You put a lot of trust in these dogs," Maltese said. "You count on these guys to save your life, to find the bad guy."


Two Dozen Dogs

Greta Hodges, president of the friends group, estimated the group has purchased 26 dogs for the Rialto Police Department over the years. Most come from Adlerhorst International Police K-9 Academy, a 7-acre training facility in Glen Avon, in Riverside County. Dave Reaver, co-owner with his wife, Pip, opened the business in 1976. Reaver was a reserve officer for Fontana Police Department and a reserve deputy with the Riverside County Sheriff's Department between 1977 and 1998.  "All of our staff are retired policemen and dog handlers," Reaver said. He travels to Europe every month, purchasing the dogs from Holland, Belgium, Germany, the Czech Republic and Slovakia and shipping them back to California.

Close to Home
Each time the Rialto Police Department needs a new dog, a canine officer and a representative from the friends group go to Adlerhorst to make the selection. Then the dog and handler train at Adlerhorst -- "eagle's nest" in German -- five days a week, eight hours a day, for six weeks.  In the early years, Friends of Rialto Police K-9s supplied the department only with equipment for its police dogs. In 1990, the group purchased its first dog, Sammy, Hodges said. The Police Department needed to replace a dog named Enzo, who was becoming so arthritic that his handler had to pick him up and put him in the patrol car, Hodges said. "The city didn't have the money to buy a new dog," Hodges said. "We love our officers, and we would go to bat for them any day of the week."  Each time Rialto needs to replace an ill or aging police dog, the 145-member group raises the $9,500 tab. They issue each Rialto canine a metal police badge -- worn on its collar for community functions, but not on duty -- and provide them with bulletproof vests and booties to protect their paws if they have to walk through debris, Hodges said.

After a dog masters patrol duty, the friends pay the $3,800 cost to send it to narcotics detection training. The group also covers the expenses for Rialto's canine teams to travel to police dog competitions, Hodges said. Reach Mary Bender at 909-806-3056 or mbender@PE.com   

by MARY BENDER  The Press-Enterprise


In Loving Memory of
K-9 MIKE
December 27, 2003
 
Handler: Officer Matt FioRito
Elk Grove Village Police Department
901 Wellington Ave.
Elk Grove Village, IL  60007
847 357 4100

K-9 Mike dies of cancer - Elk Grove Police Dog responsible for more than 500 arrests and 3,500 calls.  by Patrick Corcoran
It was a one-of-a-kind salute to a unique dog and dog handler.

With sixteen energetic K-9 units from various suburban and northern Illinois police agencies barking and yipping, Elk Grove Village
officials saluted the village's retiring K-9, Mike, and his handler for the past seven years, police officer Matt FioRito.   Mike, who was the village's first police dog, was forced into semi-retirement because of cancer in December. Because of the quick-spreading disease, FioRito and police administrators decided to have a veterinarian put Mike to sleep Dec. 27. The 11-year-old Belgian (shepherd) malinois worked up to the end. He was with FioRito at a post-Christmas roadside checkpoint on Dec. 26. Mostly he visited with the officers on duty. Two weeks earlier, just before he was diagnosed with cancer, Mike chased down three prowlers in the process of committing a burglary in the Elk Grove industrial park. He caught the men two blocks from where they were first spotted, hiding in some bushes.    Police Chief Steve Schmidt said the decision to put him to sleep was made when the dog's kidneys shut down and he refused to eat.  Schmidt said Mike's final arrests are a perfect example of the abilities the dog provided for the department.   "The dog's senses are a million times more sensitive than a human being's. How many man-hours would it have taken to catch those guys? When we go into that kind of situation, we try to secure the area, but you only have so many men to secure an area that can get to be pretty large," he said.  The statistics compiled by the police department speak volumes about Mike's ability to sniff out drugs and track criminals. Between April 1996 and December 2003, Mike was responsible for 566 arrests initiated by FioRito and assisted in 298 more. He also had a role in the confiscation of 93,924 grams of marijuana, 741 grams of cocaine, 801 grams of heroin, 34 grams of methamphetamines, 65 grams of LSD, and 17 grams of hallucinogenic mushrooms. The net total of cash and vehicles confiscated as a result of K-9-related arrests was $95,600.   In all, FioRito and Mike responded to 3,500 calls, including 289 in neighboring communities such as Arlington Heights, which doesn't have a police dog, and Schaumburg.
Schmidt said the dog was not only extremely useful in crime fighting, but also beloved by the community.    He's definitely going to be missed. He was very good with the kids at schools and was very recognizable. Mike always walked right behind me during the night parade in June, and it was fun to hear kids and adults talk about our dog," Schmidt said. Schmidt said he received a sympathy card Tuesday and expects the outpouring from the community to continue once word gets out that Mike was put to sleep. The police department still has one K-9 dog, Pack, who was named by children in the community. Plans are in place to acquire a new police dog, but it could take months before the dog is paired up with a partner on the police force. The cost of a new dog ranges from $8,500 to $12,000.  "It takes a lot of dedication on the part of the dog's handler and the dog. It's a big commitment, but we're looking forward to getting a new dog, too," Schmidt said.  
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K-9 Murphy
December 18, 2003

Handler: Cpl. Dan Zakula
 City of Falls Church Police Department
300 Park Ave Falls Church
Virginia 22046 (703)241-5055

email:

Murphy was an all black German Shepherd imported from Germany.  He became my K-9 partner at the age of 4 after having been with another handler for a brief time.  Murphy was known for being a very strong-willed, obedient dog who loved going to work so much that he would bark almost the entire way there!  He was a dual purpose dog, trained in patrol work and narcotics.  He certified annually in the USPCA PD I Trials.  We also made it to Nationals and achieved Triple Crown recognition twice.
Murphy wasn't very sociable when I first got him and didn't seem very comfortable with all the attention my wife and I wanted to give him.  It didn't take him long though to realize he could trust us and he soon looked forward to being spoiled and relaxing while at home.  When he retired because of health issues in 2001, we gladly kept him as a part of our family.  Murphy enjoyed his retirement and especially liked going for walks and playing ball in the yard.  Murphy was known throughout our neighborhood as a friendly and well-behaved dog.  He was happy when visitors stopped by and he'd get all his toys out for them to play with him.
In early December 2003, he began having pain in his neck and shoulders.  After numerous visits to the vet, x-rays and medicinal interventions it was determined that his neck and back neurological issues could not be corrected without major surgery.  The surgery did not even have guaranteed success and, since Murphy was 10 years old and a large Shepherd, we sadly decided the best thing we could do for Murphy was end his suffering.
Murphy was put down on December 18th.  My wife and I were with him until the end.  It was the hardest thing we had ever had to do and we have been very sad ever since.  We miss him terribly.  He was truly the best dog we had ever had.

notified by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA  - submitted by Dan Zakula


In Loving Memory of
K-9 MAX

August 31, 2003
  
Handler: Officer Jennifer Smith
Ocean City Police Department
 P.O. Box 759
Ocean City, MD 21843-0759
(410) 723-6609

K-9 MAX 

Birth name:       Dexter V. Altlachgrund
Title:                 Schutzund III 
(Shutzund means “protection dog” and level III is the highest title)
DOB:               February 5, 1995
Place of Birth:   Germany
It is with the greatest of sorrow and heavy hearts that my wife (Police Officer First Class Jennifer L. Smith of the Ocean City Maryland Police K-9 Unit) and I announce the death of my wife's beloved K-9 partner Max. Max was 8 1/2 yrs old and has succumbed to his battle with terminal cancer. Max's indomitable drive and spirit pressed on, but his body just could not make it. Max has touched us so deeply and is a very important member of our family. He will live with us always. For those of you that were part of Jennifer and Max's K-9 career and helped enhance their lives and performance, we thank you so much. Please keep Jennifer and Max in your prayers and give the furry cops an extra treat and a pat on the head from us! 
Hey, Max, we'll see ya when we get there buddy!


 

Max was born in 1995 in Germany. He was trained in Shutzund which means protection dog work. Max was the highest pre-trained dog the department had ever purchased at that time. By the time he was 2 1/2 years old, MAX had already reached his Level III Schutzund (Master Level) Certification. This includes tracking, handler protection, obedience.  To reach this level he had to: 

  • 1.  Demonstrate an even and social temperament
  • 2.  He had to complete a successful track that was laid by a stranger, over 50 minutes old and over mile long. 
  • 3.  He had to pass a 10 point obedience test including an obstacle course while carrying a 2 lb dumbbell, retrieving a   5 lb dumbbell, being recalled and not biting while chasing a suspect, and staying over long period of time with multiple distractions.
  • 4. He had to pass a protection test including searching for a suspect, bark and detaining a suspect,  escaping from and defending himself against an aggressor, escorting prisoners, apprehension of suspects, (bite work), courage tests,
    and a fighting instinct test. 

I was paired up with Max in September of 1998. OCPD K-9 trainer Kevin Healy got Max from a  K-9 breeder / importer. Kevin Healy switched Max over to English commands in training because he was trained in Germany.  I went to a 400hr / 12 week K-9 Academy taught by Kevin Healy. Max and I trained in obedience, suspect apprehension, drug searches of buildings, cars and open areas, evidence / article searches, suspect tracking, and handler protection. I started working the streets on patrol with Max in Jan 1999. During our K-9 Academy , my fellow classmates nicknamed Max “Wonder Dog” because he was so obedient.  
In our 4 1/2 years on the road together, we compilied the following statics: 
Building Searches                  170  
Tracks                               48  
         Located suspects by tracking in felony drug cases, hit run accidents, fleeing and eluding police officer cases, burglary cases 
Drug Searches                      237 
        Located and responsible for felony drug seizures multiple arrests involving cocaine, crack cocaine, marijuana, methamphetamine  
Public Demonstrations                7 
- Certified through NAPWDA (North American Police Work Dog Association)      Comments from the Master Trainers "Good working team" "Good bond between handler / dog" "Excellent control over K-9 in obedience and aggression control" 
-  Appeared on Television and in local papers numerous times 
-  Placed 2nd Place in "Iron Dog" Competition in VA Beach (includes a four mile obstacle run) 
MAX passed away on August 31, 2003 at 7:30 p.m., from terminal liver cancer. Max was 8 1/2 years old.   
"K-9 handlers and their partners experience a very unique relationship and losing a K-9 partner is like losing a child. I am so proud of Max and all we accomplished as a team. If only we humans could be as dedicated, brave and driven as Max and his K-9 counterparts, we would be breed of super heroes.  When you see a K-9 Police Car and a K-9 cop on the street, be thankful these men and women and their four legged guardians of freedom are on patrol and watching over your city." (quoted Jeff) 
++++++++++++++
My proudest moment with MAX on duty: 
We tracked a fleeing suspect through the little Salisbury area for 5 blocks over pavement and grass. As MAX and I approached the suspect, the suspect came out of his hiding spot and started to run again. I gave my commands for the suspect to stop and warned him I would release MAX if he did not stop. He did not stop and continued to run. I released MAX and MAX ran after the suspect to apprehend him. Just as MAX was about to bite the suspect, the suspect surrendered. MAX had enough discipline to do exactly as he was trained and NOT bite the suspect. He was trained to use force only on people not surrendering. MAX stopped in mid-stride and barked and detained the suspect until we handcuffed him.  I was very proud because my dog made a split second use of force decision that many humans would not be able to make and he made the absolute correct legal and moral choice! 
submitted by Jeff Smith who misses him also


In Loving Memory of
MERCURY
Born: March 13, 1988-Died: October 24, 2003

He served 13 years

Officer Sean Wilson
Savannah Police Department 
 
201 Habersham St.  Savannah Ga. 31401   912-652-3516


The picture of Mercury and I was taken about 2 weeks before he died. It was during a parade to honor Pulaski. Mercury was the riderless horse.  Sean
******************
Chaplain's Message by Rev. Wm. Gardner
A Lesson for Living from Mercury
Several folks gathered at the Mounted Patrol Barn las Thursday to honor not only an equestrian friend, Mercury. Also to honor  the friendship itself, between a horse and a human, each a member of an entirely different species, but each created by a loving God.   Each of us knows that the human bonds that develop in life are some of the strongest. The bond of parent and child, husband and wife, and of parts in the department gives security and meaning to life. Yet, there is a special bond between people and animals that feels as close as the bond between human beings. That relationship becomes so close that each can anticipate what the other's wants and needs are. When that relationship comes to an abrupt end as it did with Mercury, it is very difficult. Even though we know that the days of life on this earth are numbered, we grieve, nonethless, because loss hurts. We can only be thankful that Mercury did not suffer or have to be put down. In the service we offered thanks for Mercury, whose name from mythology calls to mind the speed and grace of a messenger. God created, in this magnificent animal, a sense of layalty and independence, yet he allowed hiimself to be bridled by training and gave the department 13 years of faithful service. According to Providence, Mercury has served well.
I call that horse sense, and we would do well to apply it to our own lives. We will live the most effective lives of service when we let our Creator take hold of the reins, and even though we possess and independent nature, submit to His leadership.

Mounted patrol horse, Mercury, die November 26, 2003. This one died literally on duty. He had a heart attack while on patrol at the fair grounds.  
The Mounted Unit consists of five Police Officers and six horses. Policing on horseback provides the flexibility to patrol areas that vehicles cannot easily reach, such as squares, parks and other pedestrian areas. It also provides a "perch" from which riders can easily observe crowd activities or look over walls and fences. The horses are immensely popular with residents and tourists, and provide a means for maximizing citizen contacts in the downtown area.   The Savannah Police Department has a rich history with its Mounted Patrol, dating back to 1796. Today, the Mounted Patrol is not only popular with the public and especially children, but they are also an immensely useful as a tactical instrument in the face of an unruly crowd. 
submitted by: Paulette Nelson

*********
The Top & The Bottom
I am the top half of a mounted patrol team,

working from horseback, a fulfillment of dreams.
My horse, my steed, just as in the days of old,
together we ride, together we're bold.
Every muscle I feel as we both work as one,
for it's you underneath me that makes this job fun.
Although there are days when you do give me attitude,
from you I will gather, all of my fortitude.
We enforce the laws and meet people,
all the day through,
and when we're greeted by others,
the one they speak to is you!
You help a cop's image, in a positive way,
an Officer on horseback, we'll help save the day.
For our Maker, he gave you the strength from above,
together we'll ride, together, in love.
Our ride for now is over, it's the close of the day,
you nicker so softly, as I bring you your hay.
************
I am the bottom half of this God fearing crew,
The love from my partner, will help see us through.
I was born to run wild, leave the danger that's near,
But the strength on my back, says I've nothing to fear.
I feel your hands and your legs, they help as you guide,
It's your strength that sustains me, when I could run and hide.
Your spurs sometimes tickle, you use them to nudge,
Sometimes I sure need them, because I won't budge.
The children, they see us, they squeal with delight,
An Officer on horseback, what a beautiful sight!
When I am on duty, I'm not allowed to eat,
But just look at that grass, it's just under my feet.
No one can describe it, this partnership and team,
We'll work as one forever, I'll feel you in my dreams.
The ride for now is over, the tack is recounted,
I'll rest till that time, we again will work mounted.
By ---Phil West MOUNTED OFFICER

In Loving Memory of
K-9 MEKO
2003

Handler: Officer Tom Cortese
Connecticut State Police  K-9 Unit
 1111 Country Club Road
Middletown, Connecticut 06457-9294
PH: 203-630-5656  Fax 203-630-5664
 
Loss of police K9 mourned By: Linda Medura , correspondent    - East Hartford Gazette 2003 
 Meko appeared on an EHPD trading card. For East Hartford Police Officer and Investigator Tom Cortese, the loss of Meko, his K-9 partner of 6 years, has left a void that will not be filled easily or soon. A sleek, black Lab with an energy level and spirit that even the "Energizer Bunny" would have envied, Meko fought crime undercover rather than on the streets and was considered by many Police Departments and agencies to be this town's best kept secret. But Meko died while being treated for an unrelated problem in June 14. "When you talk about K-9's," says Cortese, "you're talking about a lot of different types of dogs and the jobs they do. Most folks are familiar with the Patrol dogs - the German Shepherds they see on the streets taking on the bad guys. But then there are the specialty dogs, sometimes labeled Food Reward dogs. These are mostly your Labs and Retrievers who are trained in arson, bombs, drugs, search and cadavers."  Meko's specialty was narcotics. He was one of only 8 State Police certified narcotics crime-fighting K-9's in Con-necticut that could do this line of work. While patrol dogs lead hard, danger-filled lives, specialty dogs live just as dangerously and are regarded as true working animals, in every sense of the word. Not only are their days highly structured, but they must work every single day in order to eat. The Food Reward Method used to train them is rigorous and labor intensive for both the dog and trainer. Cortese explains how 365 days of the year, for 6 years, he devised and set up training aids, places where he hides drugs. Given Meko's own keen intelligence and his breed's innate appetite and drive, it didn't take the K-9 long to ferret out these stashes and in time, the entire process became a game.  "You could just see it in his face," says Cortese. "The minute he saw me with the leash and food packet, his behavior and attitude changed. He couldn't wait to begin."  Life wasn't always so kind to the spirited lab with the constantly wagging tail. Before Cortese rescued him, home had been a cage at the New Britain Dog Pound. A friend, knowing the Officer had been looking for a dog told him about the lab. Cortese came to visit, did some basic tests, found Meko very responsive and ended up adopting him on the spot.  Shortly after, having passed all the initial tests with flying colors, Meko and Cortese were accepted into the Connecticut State Police K-9 Narcotics Academy. Along with 6 other teams, they received 10 intensive weeks of training. The two graduated in May of 1999.  K-9 Meko and Officer Cortese are credited with seizing millions in cash and actual narcotics. They have been as-signed to the statewide Narcotics Task Force and been part of wire taps. They have assisted the DEA (Drug Enforce-ment Agency), Connecticut Postal Inspectors and FedEx. On a regular basis, the clever K-9 uncovered packages of Hash, Heroin and Steroids being sent through the U.S. mail system as well as drugs and steroids shipped internationally from foreign countries into the U.S.  Last summer, Meko was responsible for intercepting 160 pounds of marijuana destined for a certain location here in East Hartford.  In recognition of their work, the two have received numerous letters of commendation from outside agencies thanking them for their services and assistance with arrests.  Although he looks forward to eventually working with a new K-9 partner, Cortese is adamant that he won't forget Meko. Endurance. Fidelity. Intelligence. And energy! Lots and lots of energy! This black lab had it all. submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA

In Loving Memory of
K-9 MARKO

 August 24, 2003
 
 

Handler: Deputy Glenn Emery
Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department
Special Enforcement Bureau
130 S. Fetterly Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90022
ph: 323 264-7084

Parolee, Police Dog Killed
 
August 26, 2003 By Jose Cardenas, LA Times Staff Writer
     The first sheriff's canine to die in the line of duty is accidentally shot as deputies confront man.  Sheriff's deputies responding to a family disturbance call in Willowbrook shot and killed a 24-year-old parolee when he reportedly whirled around with what appeared to be a weapon, authorities said Monday. They also accidentally killed a police dog that was trying to subdue the man when he turned. Deputies from the Century station were called to a house in the 2400 block of 126th Street just after 9 p.m. Sunday. But the suspect, Deandre Brunston, had left that house and barricaded himself on the porch of a nearby home, deputies said. He told the deputies that he had a gun and threatened to kill them, authorities said. Deputy Glenn Emery, 34, released his dog, Marko, a 9-year-old Belgian malinois. The dog was trying to control Brunston when he spun toward them, authorities said. What they thought was a weapon turned out to be a black sandal with a silver buckle. Brunston, who also had an outstanding arrest warrant for narcotics, died at the scene. The dog, shot in the head, was airlifted to a veterinary hospital in Norwalk, where it died. It was the first Sheriff's Department dog killed in the line of duty, authorities said. Marko and Emery, a 14-year veteran of the department, were one of 12 teams in the department's Canine Services Detail, said Lt. Patrick Maxwell. They had been together for six years. 
There are no services planned as of yet. I will keep you posted. Denise Shadinger   submitted by J.R. Perez

In Loving Memory of
K-9 MAX -
SAR

  July 26, 2003 
 

 
 Handler: Jasmin Fraleigh
AIETecRI
Interstate Urban Search & Rescue - President
Fort Smith, Arkansas
 
I recently lost my partner and best friend, Max.  He was a 5-year-old German Sheperd and he was absolutely incredible.  Yes, he and I worked the World Trade Center site right after the disaster.  To get a decent (sort of) picture of him you can check the web under my name and you will see what a beautiful dog he was.  Unfortunately cancer was his killer.  Several vets have told me that they felt his (our) duty at the WTC may have played a major part in his illness.  Do I regret taking him - no.  Max loved his work and enjoyed being able to help in whatever small capacity we could.  Max truly made me a better person and I miss him terribly.  I have other dogs that I have trained (and am still training) for the same type of work but Max was very special - I will never forget him and I truly believe that when my time comes if he would meet me on the Rainbow Bridge than I will truly be in heaven.  Thank you for your time and keep up the incredibly great work that you are doing. 
Update: my other German Shepherd (Chief), who is only 14 months old, has really taken off!  By that I mean that he has suddenly grown up and has stepped into the role of working dog with a flair and with true love of the work.  Before he was always hesitant, not now - he takes command of his work and does it with real enjoyment.  I know that Max would have been proud
-- I certainly am.  Thank you again, Jasmin. 

In Loving Memory of
K-9 MAKO
August 2, 2003

 Handler: Deputy Matt Fiske
Livingston Parish Sheriff's Dept.
P.O. Box 850  Livingston, LA 70754
PH: 225 686 2241
 
No action taken against deputy in K-9's death  By VICKI FERSTEL  -  - Suburban writer - The Advocate  
Livingston Parish Sheriff Willie Graves said Tuesday he has taken no disciplinary action against the deputy responsible for the death of a Sheriff's Office K-9 dog. Mako, a 4-year-old Belgian malinois, died of heat exhaustion Aug. 2 after Deputy Matt Fiske unintentionally left the dog in his unit for 12 hours during the day. "I was satisfied that he did nothing criminally wrong and there was no gross negligence," Graves said of Fiske, who has worked with the Sheriff's Office for six years as a full-time deputy and four years as a reserve officer. "It was just a tragic accident that no one regrets more than him," the sheriff said. "He was devastated. Still is." Graves said Fiske was nearing the end of his shift at 6 a.m. when he took Mako, a male, to a school near his Walker home for some exercise. Fiske and Mako got back into the unit for the short drive to his home on Walker South Road, but Fiske still had 10 minutes left on his shift, Graves said. Normally, Fiske would have taken Mako to the kennel at his home, where he also houses Rudy, a retired canine in his care. Then, he would have fed both dogs, Graves said. On this morning, though, Fiske kept his unit running and kept Mako in the unit, just in case he was called out before the end of his shift, the sheriff said. Fiske then fed Rudy, a 9-year-old male Belgian malinois. After Fiske's shift ended, he went back to the unit to turn off the ignition. "At that point, he was thinking, 'I've kenneled my dog up,' " Graves said.  Fiske didn't notice Mako was still in the portable kennel in the part of the car where the back seat is normally located. The dog normally remained quiet when he was in the car, Fiske said Tuesday. Fiske said when he went back on duty 12 hours later, he discovered Mako, now dead, in the unit that still bears Mako's name painted on the side. Graves said his officers investigated the incident. A veterinarian confirmed the cause of death. "I feel horrible about it," Fiske said. Fiske said he has been working with canines for four years and with Mako for six months. "Trust me, I would never intentionally leave a dog in the car," he said. Graves said he has not yet decided if he will replace Mako, who cost at least $7,000, not counting the training and upkeep. The sheriff said he was unsure if the dog was covered by insurance. The Sheriff's Office has three other K-9s working under the supervision and care of three other deputies. 
Submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir, CPWDA

In Loving Memory of 
K-9 MARKO 
July 17, 2003
 

Handler: Officer Jim Hagerty 
Los Angeles Police Department
METROPOLITAN DIVISON 
K-9 PLATOON - 251 E. 6TH ST 
LOS ANGELES CA 90014
 
Jim Hagerty from the Los Angeles Police Department put his retired dog, Marko down yesterday. He was a Dutch shepherd and service from 1994-1999. K-9 Marko is the one on the right, the other is k-9 Rudy. Marko was Jim's third do and Rudy is his forth.  Marko was Jim Hagerty's 3rd dog, but Marko was his first dog and served 94-99.then Jim got K-9 Zane in 2000,
 but he was retired in 2001. Jim had
 Rudy and Axel for a bit each just temporaily while their handlers were temporarily reassigned. He had Bubba last October. Techincally Bubba is his third dog. notified by Dusty Simon

In Loving Memory of
K-9 MAKO   
2003


Livingston Parish Sheriff Department
Livingston, Louisiana
 
wgraves@lpso.org

Heat Exhaustion - No action taken against deputy in K-9's death 
By VICKI FERSTEL Suburban writer   The Advocate

Livingston Parish Sheriff Willie Graves said Tuesday he has taken no disciplinary action against the deputy responsible for the death of a Sheriff's Office K-9 dog. Mako, a 4-year-old Belgian malinois, died of heat exhaustion Aug. 2 after Deputy Matt Fiske unintentionally left the dog in his unit for 12 hours during the day. "I was satisfied that he did nothing criminally wrong and there was no gross negligence," Graves said of Fiske, who has worked with the Sheriff's Office for six years as a full-time deputy and four years as a reserve officer. "It was just a tragic accident that no one regrets more than him," the sheriff said. "He was devastated. Still is." Graves said Fiske was nearing the end of his shift at 6 a.m. when he took Mako, a male, to a school near his Walker home for some exercise. Fiske and Mako got back into the unit for the short drive to his home on Walker South Road, but Fiske still had 10 minutes left on his shift, Graves said. Normally, Fiske would have taken Mako to the kennel at his home, where he also houses Rudy, a retired canine in his care. Then, he would have fed both dogs, Graves said. On this morning, though, Fiske kept his unit running and kept Mako in the unit, just in case he was called out before the end of his shift, the sheriff said. Fiske then fed Rudy, a 9-year-old male Belgian malinois. After Fiske's shift ended, he went back to the unit to turn off the ignition. "At that point, he was thinking, 'I've kenneled my dog up,' " Graves said.Fiske didn't notice Mako was still in the portable kennel in the part of the car where the back seat is normally located. The dog normally remained quiet when he was in the car, Fiske said Tuesday.Fiske said when he went back on duty 12 hours later, he discovered Mako, now dead, in the unit that still bears Mako's name painted on the side. Graves said his officers investigated the incident. A veterinarian confirmed the cause of death. "I feel horrible about it," Fiske said. Fiske said he has been working with canines for four years and with Mako for six months. "Trust me, I would never intentionally leave a dog in the car," he said. Graves said he has not yet decided if he will replace Mako, who cost at least $7,000, not counting the training and upkeep. The sheriff said he was unsure if the dog was covered by insurance. The Sheriff's Office has three other K-9s working under the supervision and care of three other deputies.


In Loving Memory of
K-9 MONTANNA
Born: 28th of May 1996 - Died: 8th of January 2003

Partner: Officer Shane Houston
Victoria Protective Security
Enforcement Agency
P.O.Box 20 - Narnargoon
Victoria - 3812 - Australia 

My name is Shane Houston. I am a Security Enforcement Officer in Victoria, Australia. I recently lost my Protective Service K-9, Montanna . He was a Belgian Shepherd of the Terveuren variety, long hair, black and tan. He died from an aggressive stomach cancer. The loss of him hit me so hard because he was only 6 years old. This was totally unexpected and very aggressive. He was gone within a week of diagnosis. I would be most grateful and pleased  if you would add him to your tribute programme. I have added a photo of him and a poem I wrote for him. He Loved to work and he was a natural protector and partner with a natural  dislike for offenders.

PROTECTOR OF THE NIGHT

In the dark of night we stand united as one, 
Walking with the wind protecting the streets,
You stand at my side without fear of foe,
You remain ever loyal no matter the ask,
You look not for yourself when you get the call, 
Prepared to give all whatever the task,
Whether the job's search and rescue,
Or tracking offenders, 
You do the job proud and we will always remember.
You are my partner 
A Law Enforcement K-9 - & - A Protector of the Night.

Written by Shane Houston

In Loving Memory of
K-9 MENDI
October 3, 2003

Partner: ?
El Paso County Narcotics
TEXAS


On 10/03/03 K-9 Mendi was formally retired, that same day she passed away. K-9 Mendi attended the Houston and Texarkana National Competitions. Mendi loved children and finding dope. she will be greatly missed by over 30.000 students and faculty, especially her handler and his family. El Paso County Narcotics Canine Blackjack Passed Away.

In Loving Memory of
K-9 MICK
Wednesday  November   2003

Handler: Capt. John Best
Essex County Sheriff's Department

802 676 3500
St. Johnsbury, VT
 
 
Patrol Loses K-9 PartnerBY ISAAC OLSON, Staff Writer  -  Friday December 12, 2003
Mick, a K-9 officer made famous by a local school girl, was put down Wednesday after being diagnosed with a deadly tumor.  Jordan Noyes, now a sixth grader from Canaan, made sure Mick was one of the first border patrol canines to be fitted with bulletproof armor last year -- a move that caused a stir in the U.S. Senate and led to the amendment of a law.  After writing a persuasive essay for her fifth grade teacher on why K-9 units should be dressed in protective vests, Jordan set out to make that happen -- fund raising enough money to gear up two four legged officers.  With the help of the Essex County Sheriff's Department, vests were bought and ready to be fitted but, because of homeland security regulations, Mick, the long-haired German shepherd Jordan was aiming to protect, couldn't accept the gift.  That's when U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., stepped in and took action, getting Congress to alter the law and allow the gift to be given.  Sadly, however, the dog developed a fatal intestinal tumor that led his handler, Border Patrol Officer David Perry, to the heart wrenching decision of having his partner put down.  Perry has been friends with the Noyes family for more than 20 years.  Visiting St. Johnsbury Thursday, Leahy, Perry, the Essex Sheriff's Department and Jordan all came together at the new Passumpsic View Apartments, discussed the loss and looked to the future.  Noting an 11-year-old was able to get Congress to change a law, Leahy said Thursday was the first time he had been able to meet her face-to-face, although he has long communicated with her via phone and mail.  "It doesn't make a difference what their age is," Leahy said. "She did the right thing to let us know and good things came of it. I'm extremely proud of her.
She showed, by getting involved, you can make changes."  Jordan's mom, Laurna Noyes, said Mick's death was very hard on her daughter. Normally, she said, Jordan, with fiery red hair and a sparkling smile, is not very emotional, but hearing the news was devastating for her.  The news came in the wake of Essex County Deputy Ruby Rainault's death late last month. She died in a car crash while on duty. Rainault was a close friend of the Noyes family. Jordan's father, Jeff Noyes, is a deputy with Essex County.  "Mick was an awesome dog," Jordan said, describing the pad-footed patroller as a good friend.  Besides being a loving companion, Mick was a hard-working officer who took part in $1.2 million worth of drug seizures. Mick also provided his bi-pedal partner, Perry, some serious backup.  One wintry night, Perry said, while scouting out a drug smuggling trail, two smugglers, their footsteps muffled by snow, almost snuck up on him but his canine companion's powerful sniffer and sensitive ears caught wind of their approach.  Mick barked a warning and got between Perry and the potentially dangerous smugglers. Responding to commands, Mick kept the pair at bay while Perry got things under control.  With wet, red eyes and a noticeable lump in his throat, Perry, a 27 year veteran of the Border Patrol, said, "He was one in a million. It's hard for me to put into words what he meant to me."  Perry said Mick was a driving force for keeping his spirits up on the job.  Together for over 31/2 years, the two spent all hours together - on and off the job. Together, they were slated to retire some time next year but, Perry said, now, with the loss of his partner, he's not sure if he will have motivation enough to last until his scheduled retirement.  Leahy said the dog's death is sad and acknowledged it is a hard thing to deal with, but, he said, it should be looked at in a positive light. Citing it as a strong step in getting armor on K-9 units across the nation, he said a lot of good has come out of Mick's life.  Sheriff Amos Colby said K-9 units are very important to any law enforcement and he hopes someday every branch will have one. Colby helped with some of the fund raising and ordering the vests, but, he said, Jordan ran the show.  Jordan and Perry agreed that Mick's vest, fitted for Mick, didn't belong with any other dog; however, they may have found a home for the armor.  Because of Jordan's efforts and Mick's fame among canine handlers across the nation, the original vest is planned to be sent to the U.S. Border Patrol museum in El Paso, Texas, Perry said.  Currently efforts are being made by Jordan to continue fund raising to get border patrol dogs, along both international borders, in protective gear.  Jordan, with the help of her mother, has established a fund called "Mick's Fund." Donations can now either be sent to Jordan or to
Mick's Fund
 First Colebrook Bank
147 Main St.
 Colebrook, NH 03576
Perry said it is "a pretty neat legacy. To think that dog and Jordan might end up raising money for vests for dogs for years to
come." Mick was 6 1/2 years old. submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA
In Loving Memory of
K-9 MARCO
February 9, 2003
(In service 1993 - 2001)  
 
Handler: Officer Pete Ward

Louisville Metro Police Department
633 W. Jefferson 
Louisville, KY 40202
502-574.7678

The Louisville Metro Police lost a retired K-9 on February 9, named Marco. He was a Belgium Malinois and served with Officer Pete Ward. K-9 Supvr. Sgt. Jeff Whobrey

In Loving Memory of
K-9 MARCO
April 16, 2003

Handler: Officer Scott Lindsley
Melbourne Police Department
650 N Apollo Blvd.
Melbourne, Florida 32935
(321)259-1211 - x 3411 - K9 Unit
 
We selected and purchased Marco when he was 14 months old. His temperament was the primary reason for the selection. Even as young as he was, he knew how to "turn it on and turn it off."  He developed into an extremely effective Police Officer. Over his 4 plus years on the Department, he racked up more than 50 apprehensions. In March of 2002, Marco was stabbed by an Armed Robbery suspect who had already stabbed another Police K9. Marco recovered from that injury and continued his service to the Police Department.
Marco also knew how to be a loving pet. He lived at home with Officer Scott Lindsley and his family, wife and two daughters. Marco loved to perform for schools and other public demonstrations. During his service he conducted more than 30 demonstrations and was always a big hit. Marco and Scott  took first place in the Working Dog Competition at Patrick Air Force Base in March of 2000 in the Patrol/Criminal Apprehension category. He was cross trained in Narcotics Detection and was instrumental in several seizures of drugs. Marco will be missed by all of us. He served his community and his handler well.
submitted by Bryan Brice
 
Runaway K-9 hit by car, dies 
A Melbourne police dog escaped from a kennel Wednesday night, sparking a massive police search involving three police departments and the Brevard County Sheriff's Office. It ended when the dog was found dead, apparently hit by a vehicle. Comdr.. Ron Bell, Melbourne police spokesman, said "Marco" had been staying at the East Coast Canine Motel Inc. in West Melbourne. Marco was last seen about 8 p.m. near the Saturn dealership and Sam's Club on U.S. 192, near Interstate 95. Officer Scott Lindsley, Marco's handler, dropped off the 6 to 7 year old German shepherd at the kennel about 4 p.m. Wednesday because he was getting ready to go on vacation. That vacation was interrupted when Lindsley got a call at 7:20 p.m. and was told his dog escaped a fenced area in the kennel. Lindsley then joined about 20 other Sheriff's Office deputies and police officers, from Melbourne, West Melbourne and Palm Bay, to look for the dog around the Sam's Club area. Marco was found at 11 p.m. Wednesday near Rollins College on John Rodes Boulevard. 
Notified by J. Cortina - CPWDA 
Dir.